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 Post subject: Starting a new pile
PostPosted: Fri Apr 04, 2008 6:06 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 7:33 am
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
Making a compost pile on our acreage. Don't live there so won't be able to water it but will turn it now & then when we are there.
Have more than enuf dead trees so I'm using mostly bois d'arc stacked like you do a fence...have 10' at the back & 6' each side. Front will be open for access. Not planning on doing anything to the 'floor'-should I? It's all weeds & honeysuckle.
Neighbors are more than willing to provide horse manure. We'll have lots of green stuff-clippings, etc.
Think this will work? My pile at home does fine w/neglect. :) And I've never had manure for it.

Patty

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 11, 2008 7:36 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
OK-here it is-

Image

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2008 3:14 pm 
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It looks great!

Don't worry about using anything on the bottom of the base of the compost pile. Let the natural earthworms and other beneficial soil creatures come up in the pile and help decompose the organic matter.

Use any combination of shredded or small carbon/carbohydrate materials and protein/nitrogen materials. Normally use at least 2-3 times more carbon materials than nitrogen materials.

You can also use any animal matter in the pile as long as it is on bottom under lots of leaves or hay, and as long as you use 2-3 times more vegetable matter than animal matter.

Try to keep the pile aerated and moisturized for faster mature compost. You can aerate the pile with static sticks or piles, or just by poking the pile weekly or so with a fork or broom handle.


Happy Gardening!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 6:40 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
Thanks Cap't!
I took a big bag of compost from my pile at home as a 'starter' (kinda like gals do w/sour dough starter :) ) and Honey our 'Regal' (rat terrier/beagle/? mix) killed a rat so it's at the bottom of the pile too. Haven't gone to the neighbors for horse poo yet but will today.

Patty

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 20, 2008 7:16 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
There is nothing like a fresh dead mouse to heat up a spot in the compost pile! The more the better! :lol: Be careful not to bury living (or recently living) materials too deep in the pile. It needs air to break down. In my situation, mice will completely decompose in 1-2 days just 4" - 6" beneath the surface. This way it does not smell, either. My neighbors would complain if it did!

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 Post subject: Rat in Compost Pile?
PostPosted: Mon Apr 28, 2008 4:07 pm 
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Location: Desoto,TX
:wink: Wow!!! a Rat!!!! I’m new at this organic stuff. As a matter of fact -- I just started my 1st compost pile 2 weeks ago. I was having a hard time deciding if I should include poo-poo from my two Chihuahuas’ (I, however, did) -- But you say a “Rat” I would never had done that. Don’t rats carry dieses? Is that really ok for compost piles?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2008 8:40 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
Well, DeSotoGrown, I think rats only carry diseases in New York City! :) Sorry-guess that was a slam on New York.
'MY' rat was a country rat. Darn thing was nearly as big as a cat tho!! :shock: :shock:
You can put anything in a compost pile that was once living or that you'd eat. Like vege clippings, etc. The compost bin in question is out in the country so if there are some smells that would bother neighbors...no neighbors!

Patty

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 Post subject: Simple Question
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 3:11 am 
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Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
I want to build a compost pile but am wondering if it matters where I site it, i.e. sunny location, shaded location, ??

Does anyone have any ideas on this? I have browsed the web but not found anything that addresses this item.

Any help would be appreciated.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 8:22 am 
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Sunny or shadey, that doesn't matter in composting. The aerobic composting microbes don't need direct sunlight to breed and thrive in the compost pile.

What matters, and what makes it hotter and faster in decomposition is your organic matter materials, aeration, and moisture control.

Make sure to keep a good balance of nitrogen and carbon materials.

Keep the pile aerated. I refer either constant aeration with pipes or sticks, or just keep poking holes in your piles weekly with a broom or fork handle device. I'm not a big fan of turning compost piles too much. It disturbs the beneficial fungi and other organisms in the piles too much.

Maintain constant moisture in the piles. I also recommend using dry molasses or any type of manure tea or protein based tea as a nitrogen/microbial activator for faster decomposition and internal heating of the compost pile.

Happy Gardening!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2008 8:33 am 
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Location: Weatherford,TX
The reply by Captain is right on. I just wanted to add that in our area, being hot & dry, it is easier to control the moisture level in a shaded or partially shaded area.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu May 08, 2008 6:35 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
My compost pile at home was in the sun until a 'volunteer' redbud grew next to it. It's in partial shade now.
60 mi N.E.-in the picture above-I tried to set it in partial sun...now that everything is leafed out it may have more shade than I wanted but I'm sure it will be fine. I like that about organics...nothing is too exact. :)

Patty

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