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 Post subject: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Sat Jun 27, 2009 4:03 pm 
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Joined: Tue Jun 02, 2009 10:59 am
Posts: 12
Location: Ft. Worth,TEXAS
Any worm wranglers out there? I am planning on making some bins for raising earthworms. 1) how deep do I need to make the bins to keep the worms from baking in(today anyway) 103 degree heat. 6" enough? I've got some 2x6 recycled that I want to use. 2) size and distribution of vent holes? My plan is to make a couple of 4'x4' "drawers" that I can stack in an open "cabinet" under a cover in the back yard. Any thoughts? Any recommendations on local vendors for nightcrawlers or redworms?


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Wed Jul 22, 2009 4:54 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:17 pm
Posts: 81
Location: fort worth,TEXAS
I TRIED worm composting last year and failed miserably lol!
Mistakes I think I made:
Inconsistant moisture, my bin (about 2' x 2' wide and 6 inches deep) was always too wet or too dry. I was sort of lazy about monitoring...
Overfeeding with kitchen scraps. And leaving them too large.
Not freezing kitchen scraps first, to prevent seed maggots from hatching and taking over...
Also, I THINK you have to use red wigglers because earthworms can't take the heat of composing...I got them from Marshall Grain, but I don't know if they have them still...call first...
I hope you do wayyyy better than I did!
Good luck, Merri


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Fri Jul 24, 2009 12:55 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
I am a red wiggler "rancher" and vermicomposter. Will be going fairly large scale this fall and will be able to supply them locally. It will be easier on the worms if you wait until fall for them to adapt to new "digs" without heat stress. Would love to help anybody be successful with their worm bins or using the vermicompost/vermicompost tea in your yard and garden--it is really wonderful stuff.

Try again! With a little worm support, you can make your food scraps work even harder for you, without any heavy lifting (the red wigglers do that!).


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Sat Jul 25, 2009 1:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 02, 2007 2:17 pm
Posts: 81
Location: fort worth,TEXAS
Yeay wormrancher!!!
I don't know if there is a means to shoot me a message with your contact information (if you don't feel comfortable posting it here in the public eye lol)
I would love some worming tips!
I have one of those nifty stacking worm bins and can't wait to try again this fall with your expert advice:) and worms:)
thanks, merri


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Mon Aug 10, 2009 2:40 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
Hi Merri--sorry, I have been out of the country for last 2 plus weeks or so--the worms and gardens survived, whew!

I am in the process of building a website, and once I get that online I will add that to my posts. Meanwhile, fire questions away here or feel free to send me a PM.

I got into this worm obsession to help my garden obsession, now I am wondering if I am just obsessed. I was digging out a future worm trench this morning in the awful heat--but you should have seen the sweet potatoes I harvested at the same time that had been fed my Worm Tea!

We'll get you to be successful with your worms and you won't believe the way the vermicompost/tea can help your gardens! :D


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:49 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
I will have an ongoing Vermicomposting and Vermigardening educational blog on my recently published website (that would be this morning, ha!).

Hope we can talk a few more of our local friends into the wonderful world of worms--such a great way to reduce your waste stream, help your garden, and have a lifetime of kid's science experiments!

www.txwormranch.com


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Tue Sep 15, 2009 3:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
Texas Worm Ranch was in the news...

http://www.lakehighlandstoday.com/index ... m_rancher/


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 7:01 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2003 9:01 am
Posts: 961
Location: Dallas, TX
Good stuff! I'm curious about the LH Community Garden. Since Scott's is the sponsor, how much luck are you having keeping it organic?


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 Post subject: Re: earthworm wranglers?
PostPosted: Wed Sep 16, 2009 8:26 am 
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Joined: Sat Feb 28, 2009 8:35 am
Posts: 102
A few edits, after having my morning coffee amendments:wink:

...I would consider Scott's a donor for our garden, rather than our "sponsor". Therefore, there is no push to use a particular brand of product.

The entire garden is "organic". With 90 plots and plotholders, there are varying degrees of knowledge, definition, and adherence to the most stringent organic programs. A great start is using no chemicals, and the rest of the education can be coaxed along over time (many have never gardened before). Since many plots are shared between several families, I would guess we serve well over 100 households in the Lake Highlands area. If we can increase local produce consumption, change home behaviours from chemical programs to organic programs, and convince people to compost food and leaf waste instead of sending it to the landfill--what a great thing! Maybe a few of our neighbors will catch on too, doing the right thing is contagious, after all. :)

Scott's helped fund our original garden, expansion of the garden and donation garden and they donated some product (including some chemical stuff that we never used). We are grateful for their donation and how it allowed the LHCG get started. There is no communication to gardeners about brand products to use, and I would say many of the gardeners look elsewhere (especially to you, Howard!) to continue the health of their soil and plants. This fall, there will be a big push for education for our gardeners--including composting guidelines, good choices for organic amendments, water use, etc.

The garden is a great educational forum and social outlet crossing all ages and demographics. Not only that, it gets a lot of press in local media, which influences thought and behaviour beyond the garden. Everybody in Lake Highlands is proud of this wonderful asset to our families and community. Here's your invite--let me know when you want a tour!


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