It is currently Mon Feb 08, 2016 12:54 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2003 6:50 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2003 7:16 am
Posts: 10
Location: North of Dallas
We inherited a shower stall that is pretty gunked up with old lime deposits, soap scum and rust. I'm looking for an organic approach to cleaning it well (as in gone). I've tried using baking soda/vinegar as a scrub and soaking the doors in vinegar but am not able to clean it well. This house was a rental house for many years before we purchased it, which explains the deep clean it needs.

Any other suggestions?

_________________
--Darcy
I owe my allengiance only to the Giver of all good things. --Rich Mullins


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Organic cleaning
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2003 3:17 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 12:30 pm
Posts: 18
I would suggest a product I have used called "Orange TKO" I found it at Central Market. It is a concentrate and might seem expensive at first, but you MUST dilute it. I found additional information on the product at their website. Try www.oragnetko.com if you can't find info. post another message and I will try to find my paper copy I could mail or fax to you. You will need to know the ratio of Orange TKO to water. The list I have goes from mist (for glass & windows) to light (countertops) to general which I use for hard water, laundry stains, oily stuff on my stove and counters. The best way to deal with it is to spray it on and LET IT SIT, that's difficult for me, but it really makes a difference in how well it will work, also there is an orange scub...like soft scrub that I have at home that really works, I don't remember the name of it. I'll look tonight and post tomorrow. It also works pretty well. Someone on this board also recommends a couple of natural cleaning books, I haven't bought them yet, maybe you could check with your library to see if they have them that you could borrow. The books are "Clean House Clean Planet"...oh I don't remember the other one. Look below at the posts it should be in there a few threads down.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 22, 2003 4:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
I think the "soft scrub" product Shelly referenced may be the Orange Clean Power Paste. It is available at Tom Thumb, WalMart and probably many other places. It comes with its own scrubbing sponge, and might give you the ooomph needed to take on some of those stains. Work it into a lather and let it sit, work it again and then rinse. You may need multiple applications.

Good luck, and post your results.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 8:13 am 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 12:30 pm
Posts: 18
The stuff I was describing like soft scrub wasn't the Orange Clean Power Paste. It comes in a bottle like soft scrub does. But I would be interested to know if the Orange Clean Power Paste works well? I am always looking for good products and good ideas to clean without toxic chemicals. :)


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 9:32 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
I use the Orange Clean Power Paste for a variety of clean up chores. I am happy with its performance.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Apr 24, 2003 1:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 12:30 pm
Posts: 18
I am completely out of the "soft scrub" orange cleaner I had before I can't remember what it is. I think I found it at Central Market also, I'll have to get some more and then post what it is. I'm going to try the Orange Power Paste too. I know citric acid is a good cleaner, but you have to be careful because it can be very hard on your hands, I wouldn't be confident using it much without having more knowledge about it. The Orange TKO can also be very drying to the skin, but it works very well. I also use the Orange TKO and salt to get extra scrubbing power for jobs like the shower. I also need one of those scrub pads with a handle to work better.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2003 8:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2003 10:59 am
Posts: 277
The other replies have hit the d-limonene based cleaners, so I'll add some and address the acids for the soap scum and lime.

First, use gloves! Anything that will remove the tough deposits is likely to be rough on your hands.

Second, I don't believe kitchen vinegar, which I assume you were using, is a strong enough acid to have a fast effect on the soap scum and lime. (It also won't have a fast effect on the grout, either!) If you want to use a green pure acid product, you probably will have to go to 10% or 20% acetic acid (pickling vinegar and beyond), use the citric acid already mentioned, or go to another organic (that is, carbon containing) acid like glycolic. The thing is, any acid will react some with the alkaline component in most grouts. Because acetic is a weak acid, it still will take longer to loosen the scum and dissolve the lime (and eat the grout) than a strong mineral acid like sulfuric or hydrochloric. Acetic acid is volatile, so it will put off fumes -- try to ventilate the area as best you can. One thing that might help on the doors is to lay them flat, spread whatever acetic acid you're using, and cover the surface with something that will reduce evaporation without being eaten. Plastic comes to mind if you have some used plastic sheeting that you can't recycle, maybe a torn garbage bag or a shower curtain. Once the soap scum loosens, it "should" be removable with a brush and water. As for the grout in the floor tile, you probably can't leave acid on it for a long time (like overnight maybe) without risking some adverse effects on it.

The idea on the "lime," which is mostly calcium carbonate, is to use the acid to pull the lime into solution so you can wash it away. The idea on the soap (most commercial bar soaps really are detergents or mostly detergents, but that's another topic) is similar to "reverse" the solidification (saponification) state and move the components into something of a solution. Acid does both of these; how fast it does it depends on how strong the acid is and how concentrated the acid is. Baking soda and lye work the other way and are of no help to the dissolving action. If you use an acid wash, it would be a good idea to follow it with a baking soda rinse to neutralize residual acid, but a good water rinse probably will work as well. If the idea is to remove the scum by abrasion, baking soda might not be harsh enough -- but it probably won't be too harsh. I've considered using wheat bran or maybe something like rice hulls, but I haven't gotten around to testing them. I'm not too sure about letting a mass of organic matter go down the drain, so clogging is a consideration.

As an aside, I have thought of making a paste of dry citric acid (available in bulk at Whole Foods and probably other places) and water and brushing it on the tiles, but not the grout, and leaving it for awhile. I haven't tried that yet, but it seems like it would work. That might be a bit tedious for the average house cleaner, but it might make a fair lab experiment. As for the commercial soap scum removers, I would not use most of them. I have seen one product that appeared on a glance to be primarily glycolic acid, which is an alpha hydroxy acid that also plays a part in plant and animal metabolism. That might be an acceptable alternative to vinegar/acetic, but I don't remember the ingredient list.

Once one gets into prepared products, it probably takes one mostly back to the citrus-related products. One that I saw that combines citrus oil and organic acids and that sounds pretty good is Heather's Basin, Tub & Tile Cleaner (part of the Jason product family) at:

http://www.heathersnaturals.com/products.htm and

http://www.mothernature.com/shop/detail.cfm/sku/60385
and apparently in some retail stores.

The ingredient list is: Citric Acid, Glycolic Acid, Salt, Orange Oil, Naturally Derived Biodegradable Surfactants.

I would say that it has become fashionable to add citrus oil/scent to cleaning products, but that sometimes is a cosmetic marketing ploy to mask unfriendly ingredients. I'm not too sure about the Orange Clean Power Paste because I haven't seen the ingredients. The language "orange scented" on the label always makes me suspicious enough to read the ingredient list.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2003 9:41 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
Enzyme11

Don't tell me, let me guess...you've had a chemistry set since you were 6 :D Wow, what detail! What is your occupation (that's another thread)?

As far as the ingredients of the Power Paste, I don't know if this is complete but the label says it contains orange oil and silica flour. I personally use it without gloves and have suffered no ill effects. For vertical surfaces, its clinging properties allow for longer contact. I typically 1) apply 2) agitate 3) let sit 4) agitate 4) rinse.

For more information on the Orange Clean products, their website ishttp://www.greatcleaners.com

Thank you for the link. I will also look into the Heather's Tub & Tile Cleaner product. I use J/A/S/O/N personal hygiene products and have been very satisfied.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2003 3:10 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2003 10:59 am
Posts: 277
[quote="Mr. Clean"]Enzyme11

As far as the ingredients of the Power Paste, I don't know if this is complete but the label says it contains orange oil and silica flour.

That sounds pretty decent.

Okay, here's a thought. The silica flour probably works as a binder and an abrasive; I know some products use D-limonene with pumice powder. So, I wonder if a paste made by adding D-limonene to food-grade diatomaceous earth (which is silicon dioxide) would work well on soap scum. If it does, that could save some people some money. If you have those ingredients, could you test them against the Power Paste and see what you think? I have the DE and the orange oil, but I don't have much soap scum at the moment -- someone donated some bottled lemon juice, so I recently disposed of the shower soap scum. What little I have seemed to react the same to the orange oil/DE mix, straight orange oil, and just plain rubbing.

Now, it may be that the DE mix is too abrasive, so that's something to watch for, especially on glass. I know that we figure that wet DE doesn't have the insecticidal capacity that dry DE does, but I suspect that wet DE retains some/much of its abrasiveness when it's applied with pressure against a static surface like tile. It could be that all we need is a ~ chemically-inert carrier to give form to the application and that the abrasive quality is not needed. If that's the case, I wonder if oat bran would work as a carrier. For all I know at the moment, toothpaste and orange oil would work okay also.

Pure D-limonene is an organic solvent, so it is soluble in lipids, but not soluble in water (i.e., it's hydrophobic). I don't know whether an emulsified D- limonene (like TKO) would work better, not as well, or the same as the pure product on soap scum. I think I have some of both kinds, so I might try a rough field test.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 06, 2003 4:24 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
I can vouch for the Orange TKO (strong, 1 oz in 32 oz water mixture). I use it for quick shower cleanups with a microfiber cloth. Spray the entire shower stall as a mist and wipe down. This knocks out just about all of the soap scum issues I encounter. When my spray bottle reaches 1/2 empty, I just fill with water and continue clean ups on kitchen and bath countertops etc. I reserve the Power Paste for when I need that extra "punch"

Lemon juice? From concentrate? Do you strain to keep the solids from clogging your sprayer?

I concur on the toothpaste idea, it makes a wonderful polishing agent on its own.

Keep that chemistry set working, and don't forget to post your results!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue May 20, 2003 10:08 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Apr 29, 2003 7:23 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Cedar Hill
I would use a scraper, like a razor blade scraper. Just scrape off the gunk if you can without scratching the tile or glass.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Spray Cleaner with Punch
PostPosted: Tue Jun 24, 2003 4:47 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
The best mixture I have ever used as just a spray was half 20% vinegar, half water with 1 oz. of Orange TKO. Bang! It works great! But remember the TKO will pock plexiglass so don't spray it on the doors if that's what they're made of. It sure cleans my shower! It's also great on sinks, tubs and tile floors. Spray and let it sit for a while, then wipe it down with a sponge, mop or stronger scrubber if you like. A once over with plain water completes the job. Make sure you rise out the sponge or mop well or it will break down if it is a plastic base. What a great alternative to bleach and ammonia! Yuk!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 1:50 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Old topic but I have a quick remark.

I've had great success keeping my showers and tubs clean for about 10 years using the after-shower sprays. I think the one I use is called Clean Shower. It doesn't seem like it's doing anything but I've not had a major shower cleaning job in 10 years and you can see right through the glass doors.

The main ingredient is alcohol so inasmuch as alcohol is an organic product, that works. Calcium dissolves (slowly) in alcohol and the soap scum softens and turns clear with alcohol. Then just a brief scrub with a kitchen scrubbie on a monthly basis takes off anything that might be accumulating. Wonderful!

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 4:42 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
Since this thread has been revived, I'll mention a new "tool" I've added to my bag o' tricks. A vapor cleaner. No, not a steam cleaner as seen on the infomercials. These cleaners emit less liquid, but more heat. After I received it, I used it with a microfiber towel to clean the shower walls, tub, and fixtures. Results, a very clean tub/shower. It was not really that dirty, but I was able to acheive the same results as with the Orange TKO and microfiber, but with even less environmental impact.

_________________
Keeping it clean and green here, Boss.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: cleaner
PostPosted: Tue Aug 19, 2003 5:52 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat May 10, 2003 5:48 pm
Posts: 806
Location: Weatherford,TX
There is a product called CLR. I works well on some problems. I have no idea if it is organic or more importently, does it harm the enviornment? I'm not pushing the product, just a thought. Someone may respond to this with more info.

_________________
The "soap" you use is normally chemicals, etc. Use real SOAP !!


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 16 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife