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PostPosted: Sun May 04, 2003 10:39 pm 
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Location: Whitesboro,TX
We want to build a new home in next year or so. Does anyone know about green homes - new carpets have 2000 thousand chemicals and all can cause cancer, cabinets have glues and coatings that cause cancer. I am looking for non toxic ways to build a new home.
Also does concrete homes fall into green home type, and where can you get info on concrete homes?
Bob Bard


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PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2003 6:47 am 
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Try these discussion boards first:

http://www.designcommunity.com/ (Lots of architects here; there is discussion there about stock plans, building materials, and just about everything else)

and

http://www.dwellmag.com/ (Look under "Community")

Also try:

The AIA: http://www2.aia.org/myaia/communities/c ... nityID=200 (Odd address, but that's what came up; search for "green" items).

http://www.concretenetwork.com/concrete ... index.html (I haven't looked this over much, but it came up in a search from the EWG Web site, which also offers some information: http://www.ewg.org/ ).

http://architecture.about.com/cs/greenarchitecture/

Beyond those, search the Web for green architecture, green building, sustainable building, etc. There's a lot of stuff on the Web, both commercial and residential.

There is a fair amount of discussion about whether concrete is green, due to the energy needed to produce it and, for those that live in kiln havens like Dallas County, the air pollution involved. Personally, I think that solid construction forms, like steel and concrete, fall into the green category for the simple fact that they don't loosen (at least not nearly as much) as wood frame construction does. The average (i.e., poorly built) new wood frame house quickly becomes an energy-wasting sieve as the joints loosen in a surprisingly short time. We can keep the bugs from entering the loosened joints with boric acid treatments during the construction process, but it's nearly impossible to retain the heating/cooling energy in a loose-jointed stick-built home. If you're thinking about green heating and cooling, like solar and wind, maintaining joint integrity becomes even more important.

As an aside, I think hiring a good architect (landscape architects included) saves more than it costs, especially if you plan to live in the home for awhile. I don't believe there's any substitute for a good architect whose thinking is in line with the owner's wants/needs.


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 Post subject: new home
PostPosted: Mon May 12, 2003 9:58 am 
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Location: Bulverde
check out a product called Contec, i think it is texascontec.com, i have a neighbor with a house built from it, i need to visit with them and see how they like it now after several years. Neat way to build.


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PostPosted: Mon Jul 14, 2003 9:26 am 
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Location: Salado
Almost all the information I got for "greening" my home was from a store in Austin ...Ecowise... their website os www.ecowise.com. Great people there too! We used milk paint for our walls and a concrete stain for our cabinets and floors. It has all turned out great for us!


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 29, 2003 8:44 pm 
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http://www.greenbuilder.com/sourcebook/contents.html

http://sgnb.com/

http://www.greenbuilder.com/general/articles/ChronSBC.html

I attended a lecture either at the organic show in Arlington or at a Denton Organic Society meeting on the subject of building a green home. I will search for my notes. When do you plan to begin? Have you heard of Tri-Steel homes?
http://www.tri-steel.com/!!Associate.htm

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The Laws of Ecology:
"All things are interconnected. Everything goes somewhere. There's no such thing as a free lunch. Nature bats last." --Ernest Callenbach


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2003 1:16 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
Green Building Information
Charles Cosby Service, Inc.
2261 Crown Road, Suite 104
Dallas, TX 75229
Phone: 972-241-6181
Material Characteristics

Concrete Ultra-low content of (energy- and CO2-intensive) Portland cement; replaces with rice hull ash and fly ash (organic, recycled materials). This is an innovative mix that requires a longer curing process. This results in superior structural stability and durability than conventional mixes.

Cellulose fiber insulation, Organic, non-hazardous material with high R-value.

Structural wall panels, integrated panels with expanded CFC-free polystyrene foam core; offer low weight, high R-value, low infiltration.

Lumber Wood posts, beam and trusses from reused or locally salvaged lumber wherever possible, else from sustainable harvested trees; also recycled plastic lumber.

Tile Bathroom tile made from recycled glass.

Paints and varnishes Low or zero content of volatile organic compounds (VOC).

Notes
[1] Vern Goldberg, WGA Associates, Dallas, TX.
CARPET
Foamex International Inc (cushion) (General Felt) http://www.foamex.com
J & J Industries, Inc http://www.jjindustries.com
Leggett & Platt Inc (cushion) http://www.lpurethane.com
Milliken & Company http://www.milliken.com
CARPET/TILE
Collins & Aikman Floor Coverings http://www.collinsandaikman.com
Interface, Inc http://www.interfaceinc.com
Lees Commercial Carpets http://www.leescarpets.com
Milliken & Company http://www.milliken.com

I hope you find this useful!

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Nadine Bielling Haefs
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Gardener Exchange Forum

The Laws of Ecology:
"All things are interconnected. Everything goes somewhere. There's no such thing as a free lunch. Nature bats last." --Ernest Callenbach


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PostPosted: Tue Aug 05, 2003 7:56 pm 
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Bob-
One of the best sites I know of is right here in Texas, Austin. http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/greenbuilder/
I bought their book for $45.00 that gives a lot of information. Let me know and you can borrow it.
You may want to consider a SIP (structural insulated panel) for the exterion of your house. If you build a tight enough envelope, orient the house north and south with few windows on the east and west and prevent heat migration with radiant barriers you will have little need for much A/C. Check out this house in Fairview. Paul has his utility bills for a 2400 sq ft house posted on the web.
http://www.enerjazz.com/house/present/
Tony M


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