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 Post subject: Clover in fescue
PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2003 12:58 pm 
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Joined: Thu Oct 02, 2003 12:36 pm
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I have tall fescue in an area quite shaded by a number of cedar elms. There has always been some clover in spots, but this year the clover has started spreading more than I would like. How do I encourage the fescue to defend itself?

Bill.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2003 2:01 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 19, 2003 12:12 pm
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Location: Garland
If I understand correctly, clover is a sign of compacted, relatively bare soil. Is your fescue pretty thick?

If not, to encourage it, add the various soil amendments mentioned here, molasses cgm, compost to encourage activity in your soil

Mow the fescue as high as you your mower will go, and maybe pull some of it out by hand if you're a patient sort... :shock:

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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2003 3:56 pm 
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The fescue is not very thick, so compacted soil may be the issue. I imagined it might have been a light issue.

Compost is just about ready to start compost tea. Have been using Northaven Gardens organic fertilizer in spring and fall. Was going to put out more fescue seed, so did not want to put out cgm at this time. But I could do the molasses.

Or maybe it is better to work on the soil first and do more seed in the spring. That would make it easier to manage the falling leaves.

Bill.


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PostPosted: Thu Oct 02, 2003 8:27 pm 
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Bill-
Go ahead and work on the soil, it can only help, but I believe the problem is the growing and denser shade. As a tree gets bigger it casts a longer shadow and blocks more sunlight. Fescue is somewhat tolerant of this but all grasses need some sun.
If the lawn in the sun is still growing well then I can't believe it's the soil since both are in the same soil.
Tony M


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