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 Post subject: Additional Seaweed uses
PostPosted: Wed Sep 15, 2004 11:15 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
Scott is handling this fine so far, but I wanted to add in something about seaweed. It is an excellent foliar feed for heat and cold hardiness in plants and turf.

I have experimented with seaweed for years to protect my plants during winter. As a very specific experiment, I once brought a tender chamomile plant through a very cold Texas winter outside in the ground with just a little freeze damage by spraying once a week with diluted seaweed. It lived through several hard freezes and produced flowers for my tea the following spring. I've had similar good results with other types of plants to help them through the drastically hot summers here.

As a root stimulator I agree it is excellent. Using seaweed when I plant new additions to my garden is a must, and I very rarely lose any. You can also soak seeds in seaweed before planting to aid in germination and root establishment.

Great stuff here! :D
Kathe


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 17, 2004 10:45 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 1:30 pm
Posts: 26
Location: Dalhart, Texas
I got ya. I was thinking the weed seed becomes and stays as moist as the lawn, but it sounds like the lawn can "hold it together" longer than the weed seed because the weed seed dries out faster. Right?

Sounds like a good deal. I wish my area had the precipitation and humidity as North Texas. This year we've received appx. 7" rain, and this is very good considering the past few years we've only received appx 1" rain annually. Furthermore, we consider a nice breeze at 15 mph. This is unfortunate because 98 degree weather combined with a 16 mph wind (today's mid-afternoon weather here in dalhart) can cause our vegetation to dry out quickly. Then our evening temperature drops to 50 degrees. Insane.

In regard to the deep watering, do ya think the CGM will work out about the same for me (considering our water schedule is the same but the weather is different)?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2004 8:34 am 
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Joined: Thu Apr 29, 2004 9:05 am
Posts: 21
Location: Frisco, Texas
Placed the CGM down last Sunday after hearing the forecast didn't call for any rain for at least seven days. That was before Murphy's Law took effect. Now they're calling for rain on Thursday. What happens now? Did I just waste a bunch of money on the CGM or is 4 solid days without rain going to effective enough?

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2004 3:13 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 28, 2004 9:11 pm
Posts: 104
Location: Keller (North FW),Texas
It looks like it may rain on Friday night from what Weather.com had on their site for Frisco. So, if it has been down for 5-6 days and dry, I think you will still get some benefit (if not the full benefit) and I would not rush off to buy more CGM. After all, at $15-$30 a bag, I can pull a few weeds that do germinate. Plus, I find that pulling weeds is relaxing, just like all my other gardening fun, I mean chores... :wink:

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---Scott in Texas---
"It begins with a garden... and becomes a way of life"
"Conserve today and save tomorrow!"


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2004 9:16 pm 
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Joined: Tue Sep 14, 2004 1:30 pm
Posts: 26
Location: Dalhart, Texas
Quote:
I can pull a few weeds that do germinate. Plus, I find that pulling weeds is relaxing, just like all my other gardening fun, I mean chores...

Heh. Yeah. Once I slam down few codeine due to an aching body, then I have much fun and feel very relaxed. My yard is appx. an acre with many deciduous and evergreen trees. I do not enjoy handpicking weeds in a yard this big, but after a hard days work, the yard looks great with the many grasses which intregrate quite aesthetically. I would be furious if it didn't look great. Who says we need weeds to diversify our yards? Sometimes I think a few authors here are members of the "Love Weeds" fan club. :wink:

Thanks for the "5-6 day" info. Now I have a baseline to work from. I hope it works out good. 8)


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 22, 2004 11:30 pm 
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Joined: Fri May 28, 2004 9:11 pm
Posts: 104
Location: Keller (North FW),Texas
Weeds are not weeds by nature, by nature they are plants that have adapted genetically to thrive in an area to act as erosion controls, food and shelter for wildlife and produce oxygen for every living thing that breathes. They have their good and bad points. Since they have adapted to an area they propagate themselves very readily, making it hard to control them and that why we call them weeds. By definition, a weed is merely stated as an unwanted plant, not specifically as dandelions, thistle and dallis grass. It is better to have a field of weeds than a dusty dirt plot IMO. But, in the middle of an otherwise pristine lawn, it is an eyesore!

I have a good stand of weeds between mine and one of my neighbor's houses (dallis grass) this is not ideal to me at all. But, since he waters daily, what he has practiced has allowed it to become dominant and has all but taken over his side. My side is trying to stay Bermuda, but, unless I can convince him to back off the watering, I am doomed or blessed to have this plant there. I guess it is just our perception of the situation; I would rather have dallis grass than bare ground any day. And, really when it is mowed at 2", it really does not look bad, kind of like darker St. Augustine. If we could keep the dallis grass from making all those seeds, I bet it might become a popular turf for shaded areas. Maybe someone needs to see what the folks at TAMU would think about developing a seedless hybrid, maybe it could be called scotturf... :)

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---Scott in Texas---
"It begins with a garden... and becomes a way of life"
"Conserve today and save tomorrow!"


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 Post subject: Re:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 25, 2009 1:42 pm 
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Joined: Fri Sep 25, 2009 1:31 pm
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Scott-in-Texas wrote:
Just apply the CGM at this point. Wait about 4 weeks after the CGM to apply the fall fertilizer application. Remember to give your lawn a good deep soaking before you apply the CGM, then water the CGM in very lightly and try to keep it dry for 10-14 days post application.


I've been applying corn gluten meal twice a year for at least 10 years, and wasn't aware that it shouldn't be heavily watered. My dog thinks it's a giant buffet, as did the one I had before him, and will eat every scrap he can find unless the lawn is thoroughly watered and the meal dissolves. I have the same problem with any fertilizer that I use in-between applications of corn gluten meal, and was wondering if there's either a good commercial organic liquid fertilizer for lawns, or a home-brew that can be made and substituted for dry fertilizer. I don't mind giving up the corn gluten meal, considering it probably hasn't been doing its job effectively with all the watering I've done. Thanks.


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