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PostPosted: Sun Sep 17, 2006 7:56 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
I had about 25% of the yard sprayed with Fore herbicide as a test about 2 weeks ago. The remainder of the yard should be good. By the way, the Fore didn’t do much good at all – the TARR symptoms were only minimally affected.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 22, 2006 12:16 am 
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Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
Well, after only 4 or 5 days after applying the corn meal, the St Augustine already looks much better.

Just a few hours after applying the corn meal, we got a good 0.75” rain that turned the applied corn meal very moldy and fuzzy in just a day or two. The yellowish-TARR infected areas began to improve quickly. Some symptoms still persist, but it has only been 4 or 5 days since I treated. The fungal problem is definitely on it’s way out though.

Thanks for the tip Lou, you made a corn meal convert out of me!


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 Post subject: Corn Meal
PostPosted: Tue Sep 26, 2006 2:07 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 23, 2006 10:35 pm
Posts: 5
Location: Grapevine,TEXAS
I too have what seems to be TARR on my St. Augustine. I have been on an organic program for about 4 years now, and never had this problem. I had to resod some of my lawn due to the hard freeze we had here last winter (one night of 13 degrees here in DFW) Anyway the problem started after I had resodded the area and proceeded to water frequently. As the dead spot appeared, I assumed that it was due to the hot summer and lack of rain, so instead of following the pattern I had always followed, deep infrequent waterings, I decided to water deeply and frequently ( i also thought my newly seeded st. Augustine needed more frequent drinks) anyway, it became a vicious cycle as I kept watering more and more as the grass kept dying. At some point The brutal summer beat me down so much that I gave up and decided to stop watering and let nature take its course. The grass looks terrible, a shame since it has always been the pride of the neighborhood.
I decided to throw down some cornmeal a couple of days ago. 25 lbs for approx. 1500 sq ft. However didn't water in, as none of Howard Garret's books, and I have them all, say to water in cornmeal. I just saw it in this website, so I'll water in tonite.
Will update with what happens in about a month.


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PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 11:48 am 
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Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Texican: I just realized you were new here. I thought you were someone else. Just a note for the future (and this can be a reminder in general): while we sincerely appreciate your enthusiasm to help and learn, if you are going to link to an outside source, there are a couple things to consider. This is a private list and the sponsors pay to attract buyers. If you link to an outside website that carries someone else's advertising, then these advertisers don't like it. And if you link to an outside website that has another forum, neither the owner (Howard Garrett) nor Howard's advertisers like it. And if your outside website link suggests or recommends to use chemical controls, that's sort of like strike three. There are other gardening websites for people using chemical programs. We're trying to spread the word about organics.

Corn meal is just another organic fertilizer with the exception of its singular ability to promote the growth of the beneficial species of Trichoderma fungus. Trichoderma (try ko DER ma) literally eats other fungi. For the most part, it thrives on the fungi that cause disease in turf.

Another couple of materials seem to work against turf fungal disease. Garlic juice and milk both seem to have "anti fungal" properties. You can make garlic juice by putting 2 pounds of garlic into a blender with 32 ounces of water. Frappe the garlic, strain off the pulp for your next spaghetti dinner, and spray the juice on 2,000 square feet. For milk I believe the dilution of 3 ounces per gallon per 1,000 square feet works. You can use these weekly if you like. Milk is by far the easiest and cheapest material. The milk does not have to be white, whole, fresh, or from a cow, but it does have to have protein in it.

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David Hall
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Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


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