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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 10:34 am 
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Location: Gilmer,TEXAS
I live in East Texas (Gilmer) and repeatedly wrestle w/ brown patch in my St. Augustine. I've tried just about everything in order to solve the problem but nothing seems to work. My latest treatment(s) of potassium bicarbonate do not seem to be helping either. Each year it progressively worsens, taking over enormous areas w/ an abnormal abundance of weeds & little brown speedy spiders moving in. I realize that there is quite a bit of moisture and humidity out here but that shouldn't be the problem. Can anyone shed some light on the subject? Composting later today and starting over by resodding, I reckon.


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 30, 2008 3:52 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=10

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 23, 2008 8:27 pm 
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That's an odd link. Whoever replied to the question said too much corn meal had been used already. I didn't see any evidence of that.

Usually 10 pounds per 1,000 square feet of ORDINARY corn meal (not corn gluten meal) used every two months will keep all the fungus away. If you have active fungus then the application rate is 20 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

After using potassium bicarbonate you should apply a thin scattering of compost to restore the soil biology disrupted by the PB. The app rate is 1 cubic yard per 1,000 square feet. I would wait 2 weeks from the PB application to apply the compost. Compost tea would work, too, and be 1,000 times less expensive than the compost.

This year in San Antonio the problem was bugs. They're gone now and the grass has returned, but many of us had a very thin turf until recently.

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