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 Post subject: Invasive weed
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2003 11:52 am 
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Joined: Fri Oct 17, 2003 3:00 pm
Posts: 1
Location: The Colony, Texas
My St. Augustine lawn is infected with a dark green, thin limbed weed with 1/2" white lowers with a yellow center. It is low growing and spreads far from the main root and has a long taproot. I did not notice it until July. I had used a pre-emergence chemical in Feb. and a weed and feed in May. Home Depot could not identify the weed but said Image would take care of it. It didn't. So far it is in a relatively small area, about 20 square feet. Anyone have any idea what it is? I have a photo. :(
Harry

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Oct 21, 2003 5:20 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
You must be new to this site. First of all, I must tell you that the weed and feed products are great. That is, if you want to kill trees.
I see you have learned that Image does not do what it says it will do. Same holds true for all the synthetic chemicals. I know, it seems crazy that these things are still sold. There is money to be made on the hopes of people. Besides, most people just don't know any other way. I was guilty of that for the longest time. Then I started listening to Howard on the radio and what he was saying sure made a lot more sense!
Let me give you some great information to look at:

http://dd.spiralfx.com/pics/documents/bop.doc

http://www.dirtdoctor.com/org_research.php Scroll down to where it says "Organic Weed Control"

I have these flowers in a few places in my yard. I think they are kind of pretty.

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PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2003 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2003 3:53 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Dallas,TX
Other than what Organic1 said, there have been a lot of us trying to figure out what this pesky stuff is over the past year here. You are right in that it snakes out widely under the St.A. runners!

It's real easy to pull out after a rain or watering, and this time of year it's easier to spot as it flowers. Good luck!

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2003 4:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 9:18 pm
Posts: 1093
Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Check out annual aster (aster subulatus). The most abundant aster occurring in the state. Annual astor is common in lawns, blooming profusely during August-December even when mowed quite short. In the winter they turn almost black but the seeds have already been sown.
Tony M


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Oct 24, 2003 7:40 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2003 3:53 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Dallas,TX
Tony... where you been all these months we been lookin' !?!?!

That's it! http://www.acclaimimages.com/_gallery/_SM/0010-0301-1104-1516_SM.jpg

It may be a wildflower, but it's a pain in the butt one... :lol:

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Oct 25, 2003 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2003 3:53 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Dallas,TX
Apparently it also goes by roadside aster, as this College Station article will describe.

All of a sudden, everyone knows what it is... ;-)
-----------
October 25, 2002

Be aware of pesky weed varieties

By WENDELL HORNE
Special to The Eagle

Roadside aster may be appearing in a yard near you. This wacky wildflower isn’t apparent until it develops masses of tiny white-to-pink flowers in the fall. They’re a half inch or less in diameter and don’t become apparent until flower clusters are formed.

Reproduction is by seed but established plants sprout again from their bases the following year. They’re perennial. True to their name, roadside asters develop just inside curbs or a few feet into lawns. Tiny seeds of this rather timid plant are transported from area to area in soil stuck on vehicles. Then they’re splashed into yards during rainy periods.

You won’t be aware of this plant until it blooms. Its foliage is about the same color as lawn grasses when mowed to height. If you encounter it with bare feet, however, you’ll experience an unpleasant sensation from skin punctures by its rigid stems.

I can’t see why anyone would fall in love with this plant as a wildflower. It’s a weed when it is growing in a lawn and it is by no means an acceptable lawn cover, or beautiful so far as wildflowers go. Physical removal by pulling or cutting with a sharp hoe gives appropriate control. Don’t allow it to seed or you’ll sentence yourself and your neighbors to years of extra work.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Oct 27, 2003 4:26 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 4:33 pm
Posts: 526
Location: parker county, texas
Is what you all are calling Fall aster the same as Heath Aster? It grows wild here in the field, but the bees like it, so I leave it alone. It's a pretty little wildflower, and at least it doesn't have burrs or stick to your socks, lol.


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