It is currently Thu Feb 11, 2016 9:28 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: Bermuda infestation
PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2004 4:36 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2004 5:34 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Rowlett, TX
Image
Here you can see that bermuda grass is slowly taking over the monkey grass. Most of our beds are becoming infested with bermuda grass. I've spent entire days pulling this stuff and almost no noticeable difference from afar. Days later it will spring back in full force. I try my best to pull as many runners as possible. What should I do?
I'm thinking of spraying 20% vinegar over the infested areas and pulling them when they are dead. Then apply more vinegar to kill most of the remaining bermuda. I'll mow over the remaining bermuda and cover it with several layers of newspaper. Any advice would help, is this the right thing to do? -Thanks


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 01, 2004 5:22 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
Ziroth,

You are on the right path. As you have found Bermuda grass is an aggressive and tenacious plant. Physical removal is almost always required. The vinegar may give you some relief, but the Bermuda spreads below the soil surface also. Once you have it somewhat controlled then the layers of newspaper topped with mulch will help you slow the spread. I can't tell if these are beds, but a physical barrier which extends below surface and the aggressive use of a weed eater will also help to provide some relief.

You may also use the Search function as this topic has been discussed before to find other's thoughts and ideas.

_________________
Keeping it clean and green here, Boss.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 1:16 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Fri Jul 30, 2004 5:34 pm
Posts: 18
Location: Rowlett, TX
Hey thanks Mr. Clean. There actually is a metal barrier, but I'm not exactly sure how deep it goes. I am aware the grass does grow below the surface, but if the those "sub-surface" runners are deprived of their sunlight from the leaves long enough they would die would they not?

Ziroth


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Aug 04, 2004 5:25 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 9:46 pm
Posts: 78
Location: florida
you could use poast and oil if you werent doing strictly an organic program!

so maybe try the vinegar with an ornamental oil,,,,,you shouldnt have any problem with the liriope getting burned but try a small spot before you cook down the whole bed!

_________________
if it aint broke, it will be!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2004 9:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Poast and oil... I don't get it.

_________________
Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Aug 22, 2004 4:15 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Thu Aug 19, 2004 3:09 pm
Posts: 94
Location: ,
I have bermuda grass runners totally covering my well pump like a vine. So I don't think any kind of brick or stone barrier will stop it. But I like it. I know a lot of people complain about Bermuda taking over mulch beds, but name me a grass that doesn't. Bermuda is so easy to pull up too.

_________________
September 24, 2004 : Preparing for the second deadly hurricane to hit this area this month! I can't take much more of this.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 6 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by eWeblife