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PostPosted: Thu Aug 20, 2009 11:46 am 
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I have lambs ear in two beds in my front yard. Last year we started having patches of it die in just one bed. When I had someone at Calloways look at it they said it had a fungus/mold caused by water and rotting. We treated it with some chemicals they rec'd but more patches keep dying. Help! What is this and how can we get our soil clean of it so the new lambs ear will live?


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 21, 2009 8:11 am 
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They rot due to overwatering mostly. Let them dry put between waterings and make sure your bed drains well. If you don't resolve the watering issue it may keep happening.

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 7:25 am 
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Thank you for your response Sandi. The are on a steep incline and get good drainage as does the bed directly next to them does, which also contains lambs ear. we have about 40 lambs ear in each bed (they are our main landscape border in the front of our house)- they are west facing beds so they get lots of sun to dry them out. One bed has this "soil disease", the other apparently does not. We have spent hundreds of dollars replacing lambs ear in the past two summers, not realizing that we had this fungus. But the fungus doesn't seem to go away. The beds were prepped by a professional 3 years ago when we built our house. We continually work them, mulch them, etc. Isn't there something we can add to this bed to kill this fungus so we can save the remaining plants? I read about some fungus in the soil called 'phytoplorus-' something like that. Is that maybe what we have? Someone told me cornmeal would help but how do I apply it?


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PostPosted: Sat Aug 22, 2009 8:58 am 
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First, stop using chemicals. Secondly you can put a handful of cornmeal around eat plant and work it into the soil. You may want to consider a regular feeding of an organic fertilizer like Garrett Juice or something similar. Make sure the sprinkler heads in that area are functioning properly and not leaking.

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