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PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 2:59 pm 
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Location: Hurst,TEXAS
Yes, I know, this bush is the black sheep of bushes for north Texas, but it is what I have to work with.

For one, it would be really really nice if I could find a resource on how to train a bush. I have spent hours on the internet only to find how to trim. It never explains why, and never pertains to a certain outcome or goal.

I want these bushes 6', and to meet horizontally. Apparantly, the 4-5 feet recommendation most sites tell you is bad advice, because it looks like it will take several years for these bushes to meet.

I attached a pic. The bush on the left is looking really healthy, but not showing much horizontal growth. Am I wanting to cut off all those new buds below where it spread out? Is it too late to do this?

The bush on the right is looking a bit puny and I would like to thicken it up. If I have to butcher it, so be it, I can wait another season, but will this provide me with the desired outcome? Or just stunt it?

If I cut one branch in half, close to the bottom of the plant, will it spread out?

If I decide to plant bushes in between my "too spread out" bushes, would this work?

Just a note, this is about "training" a bush to grow horizontally and vertically and still be thick. I have already found info on how to treat the soil. I will be doing the "sick tree treatment", adding Garrett Juice Plus, and adding "Thrive"? I think it is called? to the weaker looking bushes for fertilization. I am also planning to buy a truckload of mulch after I get the soil amendments spread (I have 32 of these bushes)

I guess what is really stumping me is I want these bushes TALL and THICK and be a hedge. So I am hesitant to cut anything, but know if I do not it will not thicken up.


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 3:02 pm 
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http://www.shutterfly.com/lightbox/view ... d658bfd733

http://www.shutterfly.com/lightbox/view.sfly?fid=8f78c9d0e6b657990031ecd658bfd733

Image

Ok, I have tried 4 different ways to show the picture. Did any of them work?


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PostPosted: Sun Mar 10, 2013 10:49 pm 
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Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Your links require a logon to open them.

Some of the threads on this site allow the upload of photos, others you have to host elsewhere. This seems to be the kind of thread where you have to link from a photosharing site. If you can get Shutterfly to make that photo public then you can paste the link, highlight it, and click the "Img" link at the top of the page. When you preview it, you should be able to see the photo.

I use Flickr and Photobucket, they make photo sharing pretty simple.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:19 am 
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 11:20 am 
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Much better!


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 11, 2013 2:26 pm 
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I agree, good shot!

Shrubs have a lot of the same growing needs as trees, and one of the things that Howard has spoken of at length is the problem of plants
that are too deep in the ground. I scanned through photos online and don't find any that give me a good look at the base of the plants, but I'd be willing
to bet that there is a rootflare at ground level on photinia, but the growers who sell shrubs typically have added dirt to the pot before selling and most
shrubs and trees end up planted too deep. It's like burying the plant's nose underground. The swell should be exposed.

I'd suggest that before you do any cutting or splitting of branches or trimming, that you address the soil health. Brush or with a hose end sprayer
wash the dirt away from the base to expose the root flare. If the ground around is compacted, think about using the sick tree treatment on the area to
improve the general health of the plants you want as a hedge.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 17, 2013 6:16 am 
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6ft for a shrub that wants to get 15'-20' is not a good idea. Even if they are planted at the perfect depth, the shrub will be stressed because it will be continually hacked back. You will see after a few years that the trunk will be the size of a tree trunk,,it wants to get that big. I don't think there's any need for you to worry about training them because in a few years they will be at least 6' wide.

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