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PostPosted: Wed Apr 16, 2003 3:27 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 16, 2003 3:17 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Grapevine
I have a 40' x 30' area that needs to be landscaped. It is deep in the lower part of my back yard. I was thinking of possibly doing clusters of Oleander shrubs. Like little diamonds of 4 plants each.... Are there disease and/or insect problems with this idea. Would it be high maintenance? I have seen large plantings of Oleander in California and thought they were very pretty. I am looking for a plan for this area that will be low maintenance, requires little water and can take the Texas heat. This area is sunny but I may plant a red oak in the center so that one day it will be shady.

Any thoughts on this?? Appreciate it.


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 21, 2003 7:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2003 7:16 am
Posts: 10
Location: North of Dallas
Here's a quote from another posting on oleanders from earlier today. This might help you make a decision.


""Oleanders are truly winter hardy in central Texas and south (Austin, San Antonio) but the DFW area is just outside of that range. Oleanders planted in exposed area are typically burned by cold damage. Sometimes it's just the tips of the plant, but sometimes a majority of the plant will be effected. If that is the case, you'll need to cut back all of the damaged part of the plant, and let it resprout from the base. Unfortunately, over time, this leads to a messy looking plant with lots of "stubs" at the base. Oleanders that are planted in protected areas (inside courtyards, against walls that protect from wind, southern exposures, etc.) have a better chance of not sustaining cold damage. But it's never a guarantee""

_________________
--Darcy
I owe my allengiance only to the Giver of all good things. --Rich Mullins


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PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2003 8:00 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 2:22 pm
Posts: 6
You might try vitec, abelia, or althea for flowering shrubs that do well in sun. Periwinkles, lantana, flowering sage, Mexican petunias, and pentas are flowers that you might try. Good luck and have fun with your project.


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 18, 2003 7:52 pm 
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Joined: Sun Jun 01, 2003 2:48 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Sherman
I live in North Texas close to Lake Texoma and planted 12 hearty Oleanders red and pink varieties. They are unprotected and I did have freeze damage on the pink varieties, but not on all of them. Overall - I am pleased with them and the flowers are beautiful. I would also recommend Texas Sage.


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