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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 10:45 am 
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Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Have you ever planted something that you now wish you hadn't? Something that you now spend your time trying to get rid of.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 10:39 pm 
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Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Okay... I guess I regret asking.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 01, 2005 11:58 pm 
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Location: Saginaw,TX
Yes, but it is a tree. Long ago we planted a silver maple.It was such a waste of time. It had something wrong with it every year. I wish we planted willow oak or something. Oh well,at least we don't have to take care of it anymore because we moved and left it for someone else :lol: .

When we moved to our first house(the one with the silver maple), in middle of the front yard was a giant pampus grass. We did not like it cause it was in the strangest place to put the thing. So we moved it ,and it HURT :shock: ! We should have worn jackets. Pampus grass are the super security system. Well when we removed it, we notice a small stick out of grass in the center :shock: . Looks like someone had planted a tree there first, but put pampus grasses(3 I think) around it, and the grass ate the tree. I know some folks recommend pampus, but I don't want one. Even,silver maple seems better than the grass.

Tree Dude


Last edited by Tree Dude on Sat Apr 02, 2005 8:50 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Sat Apr 02, 2005 6:44 pm 
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Location: Forney, TX
kbrew wrote:
Have you ever planted something that you now wish you hadn't? Something that you now spend your time trying to get rid of.


Yes, mint.....I knew it was invasive, so I planted it in a large pot by my vegetable garden, but the runners escaped and now it's a constant battle....<sigh>


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 Post subject: Plant
PostPosted: Sun Apr 03, 2005 9:39 am 
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Location: DeSoto
Although I haven't planted anything in particular, I did put down a layer of Mushroom compost on my yard when we first started organics. I had luck in the past, but this time, the compost was from the same place, but a different supplier. I now own the weediest yard in the neighborhood. I have worked hard all winter and now spring to correct the problem.

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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 4:18 pm 
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For me it is pink evening primrose, the pink wildflower you see blooming in fields and along the highways. It's terribly invasive via rhizomes and seed, so if you ever consider planting it in a bed, DON'T!! It will take over the entire bed and move into your lawn.

On other forums, I often hear people talking about ruellia, ie mexican petunia. It can be quite invasive I hear.

I planted some saliva coccinea in a flower bed (4 plants) and now I think I will have them forever. They are annuals but reseed freely. They aren't heard to remove, but more sprout all the time so it takes some discipline to keep them from taking over the flower bed. Of course, when they are blooming and being visited by the hummingbirds, it's hard to want to pull them up.

Marlyn


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 Post subject: regrets
PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 7:55 am 
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
I guess my regret would be nasturtiums-they came up so beautiful & plentiful & died as soon as our hot weather hit, even tho they were mostly shaded. Maybe I should just think of the "better to have loved & lost" saying w/nasturtiums! I think I'll regret digging up a 'volunteer' silver maple from our back yard & taking it to our acreage & transplanting it! (2 yrs ago) I didn't know it was a silver maple, didn't realize the 'parent' in our yard probably died b/c it was the silver variety.
Patty

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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 10:43 am 
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Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
I second Marlyn on the pink evening primrose. It's great for a meadow, but too agressive for a small garden.

I'm hoping I don't "regret" the yarrow I planted last year in my wildflower patch.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 09, 2005 10:28 am 
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I planted a white yarrow and it spread alot and didn't have a lot of blooms. I dug it out after a year. Later a planted a yellow variety with the greyish green leaves and it didn't spread at all and had lots of blooms. I planted it in an area with less moisture as well, so maybe that helped.

Another plant that I hear a lot of complaints about is cypress vine. A member of the morning glory family, it has small tubular flowers and, I think, ferny leaves. It reseeds so easily that I understand you will be pulling the plants up for ever. The two times I tried it, the plant didn't do well so I haven't had the problems with volunteers.

One plant that I love that can be a pill is the green eyed daisy. It's a Texas native that looks moderate sized in the pictures but grows 3 feet tall. In a flower garden, it blooms all summer but the blossoms are at the end of the tall stalks. The stocks generally end up leaning over and covering up any nearby plants. It reseeds amazing well. If you cut the tall stocks off, however, it will stay fairly short (1 to 1 1/2 feet tall) and will bloom constantly.

Come to think of it, I'm surprised no one has mentioned mints. Peppermint, spearmint, orange mint, chocolate mint, etc. They all spread like crazy!

Marlyn

Marlyn


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PostPosted: Wed May 04, 2005 12:36 pm 
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Location: Wylie,TEXAS
Honeysuckle! :D


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PostPosted: Sun May 22, 2005 1:07 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 10:54 am
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Location: Dallas,TX
Maryln,
Thank you for the heads up on the "green eyes" daisy. I have been looking all over town for it and for it's brother, the chocolate daisy. I read about it in Sally Wasowski's "Native Texas Plants" and it sounded very desirable. If I find it, I certainly will cut back the tall stalks to see if that helps. I wonder if I should only buy a couple of plants to ensure that I am not overrun?
Thanks again,
Kl


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PostPosted: Thu Jun 09, 2005 9:39 pm 
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Location: parker county, texas
I have tried purple passion vine several times. It never survives, but it's beautiful. Just on a whim, last year I planted a white one. It's taking over and I just planted it last Fall. I guess I'll need to move it 'cause it's shading a couple of my tomatoes.


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 Post subject: regrets!
PostPosted: Fri Jun 17, 2005 7:49 pm 
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Location: denton,TX
I have regretted planting the Mexican Petunia (reuelia) more than anything else. I now spend a major part of my gardening time trying to keep it under control. Also, when we moved into this house, someone had planted mint under a tree at the end of the driveway. This was in my beginning gardening days. I didn't pay much attention to the mint but made a nice fertile rose bed on the other side of the fence from the mint. Within a year it had taken over the bed and killed the roses. The mint grew about 3' tall! I hate mint!!!!


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 18, 2005 12:44 am 
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I planted mint and it sure does spread. I even planted it in a bed. Out of the bed, it grew. That this would happen I knew, but it sure is delightful to mow over this invasive and frightful plant when its scent fills my head.

I guess it's time to go to bed when you start sounding like a bad version of Dr. Seuss... <g>

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PostPosted: Mon Sep 05, 2005 6:52 pm 
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Location: Mesquite
My mint looks stressed out in its pot but after all the comments about mint and also the way my dad's spearmint has taken over his yard, I'm thinking I shouldn't cave in and put it in the ground somewhere. I disagree with the person who hates mint. I absolutely can't do w/o my spearmint. Iced tea tastes so bland to me now when I don't brew it w/spearmint. And I have used my chocolate mint to make ice cream (still working on the amount - I think it takes a lot and had to boost w/ extract last time even w/ several sprigs).

I didn't plant anything I regret but my home came w/trumpet vine and it's taking over the yard. Worse, the beautiful flowers are non-existent.

I also regret moving my pineapples to the garden. They seem to have been happier in pots so when I move them to pots for the winter, I'm not going to ever plant them out again.


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