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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 12:47 pm 
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I set out forty tomato plants weekend before last. Saturday I noticed that most of the plants have large white dead areas on the leaves. I've only used organic products in the two garden areas where they are planted. The garden is on some land I own in Parker county. I have an irrigation system using well water. They get 10 minutes of watering every other day.

Any ideas?


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 1:10 pm 
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Location: Keller, TX
Hate to go off topic so quickly... I don't have any idea why your leaves are turning white.

By my comment is regarding the watering. 10 minutes every other day sounds like some serious over-watering. I live in Tarrant, so our climates can't be that different, and I've watered once this entire season (admittedly, the season is just beginning, but the point remains).

Sorry for the drift,
Chris


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 2:49 pm 
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Location: Waxahachie,TX
hamelcd is right in making the statement that it is too much watering, referring to frequency. The ground does not have enough time to dry. Which promotes fungal growth that is not good for tomatoes. You should be watering deeply and infrequently. This promotes deep roots and helps to prevent the fungii that tomatoes are very prone to. I try to water my veggie garden for an hour about every week and a half sometimes every two weeks. The frequency is also dependant upon the temperature and how well your soil holds water. So during the hotter times of the year water more frequently. If your plants start to droop give them a good watering and adjust your schedule.

If it is a fungal problem like early blight try these links.

Tomatoes
Cornmeal Juice
Tomato/Early Blight

also try mixing cornmeal into the soil around the tomatoes to help prevent further fungal problems. If it is root rot I do not know how you can resolve this other than changing your watering habits.

FYI: Remember to deeply water freshly transplanted plants for at least three consecutive days after transplant.

Good luck,
Chad


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2004 1:36 pm 
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Amen! Way too much water. I planted my tomatoes about 3 weeks ago and have watered them about 4 times. Don't water until you've put your finger in the soil and it feels a bit dry or if the plant is starting to droop.

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 Post subject: 10 minutes
PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2004 2:29 pm 
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Location: Dallas TX
10 minutes isn't a volume of water just an amount of time. Am I alone in thinking 10 minutes every other day of "hand?!?" watering of 40! plants is not so much?

I've been sticking to 1 hr MWF of minimum flow soaker irrigation at 4" below the surface about 10" away from the plants. Things are coming up great! Best early season ever.


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 Post subject: Possible Retraction
PostPosted: Thu Apr 22, 2004 5:27 pm 
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Location: Dallas TX
Wow, what a difference a day or two of watering makes, now I get home and [i]I[/i] have white leaves on a few plants. Yikes. May have gotten on the soaker hose thing a little ahead of schedule. :oops: Hope that doesn't mess up my crop too much.

Where's that cornmeal?


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2004 7:31 am 
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That's what we're saying. True, it may not be much in the way of volume but it's too frequent for this time of year. Tomatoes like to dry out a little between waterings and with the spring temps and cloudy we've had you're not giving them that chance.

Now, summer temps is a whole different story. I usually water every 3 days in the hottest part of the summer. I also have several inches of mulch around the plants to help retain the moisture.

Remember, watering more deeply and infrequently is so much better than the opposite. Deeper, infrequent watering encourages deeper root growth and healthier plants.

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PostPosted: Fri Apr 23, 2004 7:34 am 
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You can get horticultural cornmeal at North Have Gardens or Redenta's. I usually go to Whole Foods Market and buy organic cornmeal in bulk.

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PostPosted: Sun Apr 25, 2004 10:10 am 
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Location: Dallas TX
I guess I'm in for more trouble, we had enough rain in Dallas to practically float the mulch this weekend. Can you do TOO much dilute baking soda? :roll:


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2004 7:20 am 
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Based on HG's comment under Baking Soda Fungicide of "Avoid over-using or pouring on the soil." I am guessing the answer is yes you can do too much. :D

FYI: :shock: Be careful I have had a few of my plants not like the Baking Soda. I had some Baking Soda mixed in with my Garrett Juice and the next morning some of my plants did not look very happy. I am now very selective of what I spray Baking Soda Fungicide on... :(


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PostPosted: Mon Apr 26, 2004 11:27 am 
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Baking soda is very alkaline. Maybe that affected your plant. Try the corn meal juice as a fungicide. I have never had a problem with it. Good Luck!

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 Post subject: Doin Ok
PostPosted: Wed Apr 28, 2004 8:49 pm 
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Location: Dallas TX
I never made a second application, I'm sticking with what I've got it's not spreading or receding really. The white stuff hasn't spread from the two vines that it showed up on and the blooms on those vines still are setting and growing with no regard to the stuff.

I might make one OT comment, I have so far had my best tomato year ever this year. This will be the first year using the knowledge in HG books and with all natural products. However, my bloom to fruit set ratio is very very high this year. I think this is in no small part due to a wildflower mix in the next plot and adjacent watercress both flowering and attracting all sorts of beautiful flying things. (We've taken to naming some of the butterflies that are unique) Maybe a heterogenous garden area benefits all inhabitants... Maybe it's the good stuff I've used. Who knows. I appreciate all the stuff you all post on a daily basis. Thanks!


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