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 Post subject: Large Plants, No Blooms
PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 6:54 pm
Posts: 13
Location: Mansfield, TX
I have a small garden with a couple of bell pepper plants, and five tomato plants. I have one Roma and one cherry tomato plant that are both doing very well. The other three tomato plants (Big Delicious, or something similiar) are almost 6 feet tall, but they have produced zero tomatoes. I occasionally see a couple of blooms here and there, but they disappear with in a couple of days. I used an organic compost and some "mushroom dirt" that my in-laws shared when we first planted in April. I spray a garlic pepper/compost tea mix on the foilage one a week or so because I had a lot of success with it last year. We have had very little rain, so I try to water every three or four days. How can I get my larger tomatoes to produce fruit?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 29, 2005 1:21 pm 
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Location: Odenville,Alabama
One of the fastest ways to increase flowering or fruiting, is to raise the available soluble phosphorus and potassium levels to your flowering crops.

One way is to actually add more P & K to the plants, either around its root zone or foliage areas. You can do this quickly via good biostimulants like various compost tea applications (more P & K) or seaweed teas (more K), as a frequent diluted foliar spray and/or soil drench.

The other way to raise the available P & K, by simply making the existing insoluble P & K in the soil and compost more soluble and available. You can do this by increasing the active aerobic microbes in the soil and compost by using biostimulants. All sugary products increase microbial growth. That is why adding a little extra dry molasses around the root zone or in a tea recipe, is a good idea.

Seaweeds contain more K than P. But seaweeds are also more carbohydrates than proteins. Therefore they help make microbes grow quickly, and make more existing insoluble P in the soil or compost, more available and soluble to nearby plants.

All molasses products are also rich in K.

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The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 05, 2005 6:18 pm 
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Joined: Wed Sep 08, 2004 6:54 pm
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Location: Mansfield, TX
Thank you so much for your indepth help. I went to an organic gardening place in Arlington (I love that place), but I forgot how to spell it, so I won't butcher its name. I purchased dry mollasses and seaweed like was suggested, and applied it to all of my plants. Now I am crossing my fingers. My next question is when do I reapply? There is nothing on the labels to indicate if I need to apply once a week, month, or season.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 06, 2005 7:10 am 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 8:15 am
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Location: Odenville,Alabama
Every few weeks. Natural fertilizers and soil amendments are mostly insoluble, so you can use them as frequently as you like.

I use diluted aerobic compost teas as foliar/soil drench applications weekly, as an irrigation substitute for most of my heavy feeders!

_________________
The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


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