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 Post subject: Peaches and Humate Tea?
PostPosted: Wed Mar 15, 2006 8:50 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:18 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
We have a liquid Humate Tea product and one of our customers has peaches and would like to know if now would be a good time to apply humate tea and if so, foliar or ground application?
Thank you,
Brad
www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com


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 Post subject: TREES
PostPosted: Thu Mar 16, 2006 9:20 am 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
Brad,
My experience has been that humate is helpful at any time. I apply mine to the soil and as a foliar spray and they are happy and healthy. Because of the trace minerals and other nutrients that are available in a good tea, the plants find a feast of what they need available in a lovely, easily absorbable form.

If they were my trees, I'd give them a good dose.
Kathe


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 8:57 am 
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Joined: Tue Oct 04, 2005 7:18 pm
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Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
Thank you Kathe, and thank you for the copies, we just got them last week, love the article!!!
Brad


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 17, 2006 2:43 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
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Location: Dallas,TX
Yeah, glad you liked it. Share those copies with everyone!
Like I said, I think the humate you add to your fertilizer makes it more
effective. I know a lot about humate and I'm convinced it really makes a difference.
Kathe :D


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 8:31 am 
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Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
I was just talking with my chemist the other day.... he makes the same humate product that I do..... anyway he says he sells his to other Organic Fertilizer companies, they say it makes all the organics work better. The only thing you have to remember is that less product more often, rather then more product less often.
Brad
www.WatsonRanchOrganic.com


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Mar 19, 2006 2:34 pm 
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Location: McKinney,TEXAS
I have about a dozen fruit trees and I have been spraying them with Garrett juice and garlic. This year I'm trying liquid compost and DE added as a pesticide. If we get a freeze this week I won't be reporting any results. One of my early bloomers has already gotten stung by a frost.
Tony M


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 Post subject: Seaweed, anyone?
PostPosted: Tue Mar 21, 2006 10:44 am 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
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Location: Dallas,TX
Hey that reminds me...everybody who hasn't tried it yet, invest $7.00 or so in a bottle of seaweed and mix 1 oz. to a gallon of water to foliar feed your plants today/tonight to protect against the freeze. Just a light misting is all you need.

I swear it works for me every time and I will be doing it myself after work tonight. Something that inexpensive that helps me keep my plants healthy is well worth doing.

Kathe


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:17 am 
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I've heard that spraying anything on the blossoms of fruit trees will affect the pollen and therefore the germiniation of the fruit. But I can't find anything to substantiate this. Any thoughts?
Tony M


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 Post subject: Foliar during Bloom
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 10:55 am 
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Location: Dallas,TX
I guess you could avoid the blossoms and spray just the trunk and branches, once the tree has bloomed. Light misting, no more than what a heavy fog would leave, shouldn't do any harm. It might affect the scent and the attractiveness to bees, I guess, but I haven't seen that to be true on my herbs or perennials. Good thought as a precaution, Tony.

Howard? Any thoughts?
Kathe


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 11:29 am 
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Location: Hawkins,TEXAS
I know that when I spray Fish, Seaweed or garlic it will effect the bee's for about one hour, Then they come back. I am not saying it is harmful to the insects in anyway, the bee's tend not to hang around for a little while.
Speaking of bee's here is a little hint if you disrupt a bee nest or bumble bee's while driving a tractor. Do not swat at them! Stay as still as possible and let them get attracted to the motion of the tractor tires. The tires will take care of them. Not that I want the bee's dead, but better then 20+ bee stings! I have disrupted many bee's in the 10+ years that I have been spraying grazing an hay pastures and have never had a sting. I have also watched other operators panic, stop the tractor and start swatting way. They get nailed!
Brad


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 Post subject: seaweed
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 5:19 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 10, 2003 5:48 pm
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Location: Weatherford,TX
Seaweed & other organic products protect the plants when they absorb the nutrients into their system.
A healthy plant can resist cold better than a weak plant. Seaweed, etc. spray is not a blanket/insulation for your plants. Think of it as sort of an antifreeze in the plant. An organically grown, healthy plant will have 2-4 degrees of freeze protection over others.

_________________
The "soap" you use is normally chemicals, etc. Use real SOAP !!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 8:17 pm 
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But, will spraying the blossoms affect the setting of fruit? I am more than ready to spray but if I hurt the blossoms that is worse than the freeze. I could always try what Kathe proposed and stay away from the blossoms.
Tony


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 Post subject: Seaweed stories
PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:06 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TX
KHWOZ has it entirely right. The seaweed doesn't put a coat on the outside, it simply reinforces the elasticity and ability to cope with heat or cold from the inside. But Tony knows that...

I looked up several resources on foliar feeding and didn't seen anything that indicated to lay off during the blooming periods. So I'd say it shouldn't adversely affect anything. It doesn't affect my tomatoes or other plants - rather, it helps. Fruit trees can be a little persnickety, but I can't see any harm in the application. My pecan tree loves it whenever I do it. :wink:

Yeah, Brad, the critters don't like the smell of the fish but they never stay away for long. :? Thanks for sharing the excellent advice on bees!

Tony, do you dare risk being the one to experiment here? Your trees, your choice. Hope this gets there in time and please let us know what you did and how it worked.
Kathe :D


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 22, 2006 9:17 pm 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
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Location: Dallas,TX
Okay, this came from the Seeds of Change website regarding foliar feeding. I hope they don't mind my borrowing. It will make everyone feel better I think. Whaddya know? They agree with me! I definitely agree with them. Here's the link:

http://www.seedsofchange.com/digging/foliar_feeding.asp
:lol: :wink:
Kathe

Critical Feeding Times
Be aware that foliar feeding isn't meant to supercede a good organic, soil-building program, but it does add that extra nutrient boost at key plant-life events, including:

In the nursery (in cell trays, flats, or containers)

After the plants are up and in full vegetative growth

When the plants start making buds, blossoms, fruits and seeds

During times of stress, especially from prolonged dry weather or if your plants look wimpy and undernourished

Before and after food harvest to stimulate and inspire continued healthy production

During early and late season frost times to lengthen the growing season and increase plant hardiness to environmental stresses (the uptake of nutrients increases the soluble solids levels in plant tissues lowering the plant freezing point)
With long season crops, an application of foliar fertilizer every two weeks will extend the fruiting season and improve the flavor and quality of the crop.


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 Post subject: Seaweed program
PostPosted: Thu Mar 23, 2006 9:43 am 
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Thanks for that link Kathe.
As I mentioned earlier, I was foliar feeding with a Garrett juice mixture, which has seaweed, all last year about every 2-3 weeks. In addition, I applied Medina fertilizer to the root zone along with Redmond conditioner several times.
Some of you have mentioned that seaweed is not a coating but more like an anti-freeze. I'm hoping the program I followed last year was enough to maintain some of that protection in their "veins". However, this year I'm switching over to compost tea and DE but I wanted to get some seaweed in them also as early as possible.
In some ways, I like the Ying-Yang of gardening and farming. If you do one thing, it affects another and there are no certain results, only reasonable risks. If I had to make a living off it I would starve.
Thanks for the good dialog.
Tony M


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