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 Post subject: Digging a pond
PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2004 3:05 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 22, 2004 2:57 pm
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I just bought twenty acres in Northeast Texas. The front 9 or 10 acres is cleared for building a house. The back 10 is thick woods. I plan to keep the woods intact. I have deer and wild pigs back there. I need advice on digging my pond. How big should it be and how deep?


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 Post subject: digging pond
PostPosted: Mon Mar 22, 2004 10:46 pm 
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Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
e-mail Tony on organic farming site. He knows a lot about ponds.
Robert d baqrd


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 Post subject: Need a pond engineer?
PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2004 8:06 pm 
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Location: Prosper, TX
Deejslady,

Call or e-mail us for help on planning and design on your future pond. We are a full-service pond and lake company that can help you with your project.

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Trent Lewis
PondMedics Incorportated

"The leaders in organic management of large ponds and lakes."


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 Post subject: ponds
PostPosted: Thu Apr 01, 2004 9:51 pm 
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Location: Whitesboro,TX
Trent: I went to your web site but could not read the chemicals on the labels.
Can you share what products you are using for your pond business?
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject: Chemicals on website
PostPosted: Fri Apr 02, 2004 7:45 am 
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Location: Prosper, TX
Robert,

Thanks for the reply. If you visit our website on the microbe page, there is a link to download the labels for PondPills and PondPacks. This method will be an easier way of reading the labels.

There are numerous products we use in pond managment. Many of them are "organic" in the sense that they are either naturally occuring (benefical microbes) or they are a non-toxic substance (oxidizer/algaecide). The two products that we offer on our website for do-it-yourselfer's are a form of beneficial pond microbes. Our goal in using these is to reduce or eliminate the excess nutrients caused by storm water runoff containing carbons, phosphorus and nitrogen. Fertilizers, oil, grass clippings, fish waste all contribute to this nutrient loading phenomenon.

Once we reduce the excess nutrients, we can curb the effect of eutrophication of a pond or lake.

Let me know if you have any more questions....hope this helps!

Cheers!

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Trent Lewis
PondMedics Incorportated

"The leaders in organic management of large ponds and lakes."


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 Post subject: ponds
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2004 9:46 pm 
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I went to the labels but they were not large enough to read.
Thanks for this explanation but if you can add something to this I would appreciate it.
Would we not be better off if we followed Joel Salatins advice about fencing all pond off and let plant life take over so there is no dirt exposed? Then when it rains the water going into the pond will be filtered and clean. We then can use a pump to get clean water out and the animals can't foul the water.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2004 9:55 pm 
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Location: Prosper, TX
Robert,

When you download the labels, they should display in Adobe Reader since they are .pdf files. Once they are downloaded, use your Adobe toolbar to "zoom in" and you'll be able to read the labels fine. If you are unfamiliar with what I am talking about, visit...

http://www.adobe.com/products/acrobat/readstep2.html

As far as your questions go, I'm not quite sure I know what you are talking about or refering to since this topic is in regards to digging a pond and not fencing, filtering or pumping water from a pond. I don't know who Joel is or what he has said about this topic you're referring to. If you could give me a little context, I might be able to help you a little more.

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Trent Lewis
PondMedics Incorportated

"The leaders in organic management of large ponds and lakes."


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Apr 04, 2004 3:59 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
The idea is to fence off the tanks (ponds) so that the animals will not go in. There are several reasons for this.

1. When an animal steps into the soft soil at the edge of the pond, the pond gets ever so slightly shallower. Multiply that by 4 feet by the number of animals entering per day and you can achieve a shallow pool faster than if left alone.

2. Animals are likely to foul the water. Animals do much better on really fresh water than foul water.

3. Livestock will knock down the grasses and plants that live near the pond edges. The pond plants protect birds, frogs, spawn, and other critters that live there.

4. Fishing is more pleasant in clear ponds than muddy ponds.

A common grass to grow on pond banks is tall fescue so the heavily matted roots will prevent a washout if there is a flood.

I don't know whose idea it was to fence off the water, but it was likely not Salatin's. Many writers have included that tidbit in their material.

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