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 Post subject: help with 4o acres
PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2004 12:31 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jun 07, 2004 11:14 am
Posts: 16
Location: Atoka,OK
Hello out there I need some help brainstorming :idea: :idea:
I have 40 acres of tree and brush That I need cleared for grazing. This parcel is sloping sandy land with a few washes of red clay in SE Oklahoma. I am on a tight budget what is the best and cheapest to reclaimed the property and put in production. The fences are barbwire in fair condition. there are no cross fenceing. Where would I get more bang for the $$$ Or would it be best just to have a dozer in for a day and just wait until there more money to spend. or what method should I used.
I want this area organic if at all possible


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 23, 2004 2:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2003 11:08 am
Posts: 118
Location: Ladonia
Dont know how tight the budget is but I would opt for the dozer for a day and stay with him and save the quality trees. Just my 2 cents.

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 Post subject: 40 acres
PostPosted: Sat Jun 26, 2004 2:43 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 12:45 am
Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
I would run some hot wire and buy goats
trained to electric wire. I would let them
cean the brush. meat goats are bringing
lots in money. They clean and you make
money off of them. After it is cleaned get
dozier in for the heavy stuff in a year or
two. In the washed areas find some old
hay - cheap - and drop it in the areas
that need protected. It will slow the
washing away and raise organic matter.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject: 40 acres
PostPosted: Sun Jun 27, 2004 12:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 15, 2004 9:55 am
Posts: 9
Location: Michigan
Goats will eat alot of brushy stuff. They do need some grass too. Goats are easy to herd. They tend to make the same rounds every day until the browse runs out. I have 28 right now but am amazed at how little they do eat. Coyotes can be a big problem if you have those on the property. I don't know what you consider a tight budget. Dozer and operator up here are $100/hour. If you have time buy a good chain saw.A chain saw can make firewood and dollars. Look at bigger trees as shade from the sun and shelter from the winter storms. I'd sure leave a few shelter belts.They are also dandy living fence posts. DO you have any Lumber species? If so think about selling the saw logs. Grass and cattle don't care about stumps. If you are going to mow, cut the stumps ground level.

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 Post subject: Might try renting
PostPosted: Wed Jul 28, 2004 10:10 am 
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Joined: Wed Jul 28, 2004 10:03 am
Posts: 4
Location: Oklahoma
Don't know exactly where you are but at Idabel you can rent a Dozer for about 350 per day or 950 for a week (week is 40 engine hours on the tractor or 5 business days/which ever comes first).

If the timber is good quality pine or hardwood, you might have a timber buyer/logger look at it and the timber might sell for enough to pay for the dozer to do the final clean up. Make sure that you get a logger that uses a hydro-ax saw or shear and that is willing to run the saw close to the ground. The chain saw guys will leave stumps knee high.

The goats are a good idea too but it will be tough dealing with the predators.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2004 10:05 am 
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Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I've been doing a lot of reading and came across some history of Texas agriculture. Apparently the Spaniards came in first with goats to clear the land. Then the next year they brought in cattle to graze with the goats. They ended up with a 1:1 ratio of goats to cattle. They used herdsmen and dogs to guide the livestock to fresh pasture as needed - no fences then.

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