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PostPosted: Mon Apr 04, 2005 8:03 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:45 am
Posts: 92
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
This friend has 26 acres of pasture land, and has never been organic. Now he's interested. Asked me to find out about his use of lime on his land (told him since I was new to the program, wasn't sure about the use of lime) and how to get rid of moss & "hydralia (sp???) in his pond. I checked this sight for how to get rid of moss, and it seems that cornmeal might be a solution. Any recommendations? He also asked about the many burrs that are on his property. I told him about the use of corn gluten meal on my yard, and that might help, but also that burrs/weeds tend to grow where there is bare ground. I also mentioned using dried molasses to begin with. Any other suggestions I can give him to help him "go organic" in his pasture/pond???


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 Post subject: lime and moss on pond
PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 2:03 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 12:45 am
Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
Go to organic farming with Tony for pond issuues.
He very knowledgeable and knows where to go to
for more info.
Lime is a problem. Like commericial fertilizer it is
sometime mixed with toxic wastes from industry -
like mercury from power plants, lead, and other
heavy metals.
You actually do not need lime. Acid soil is do to
commercial fertilizer. When you go organic the ph
will adjust over time and it will go close to neutral.
Sand burs are the result of no nutrition in the soil.
The more commercial fertilizer you use the worse
it gets because you are decreasing fertility.
I put my mix on a hay meadow in early Nov of 03
and again in spring of 04. I went back in Aug of 04
and the grass burs from the year before that covered
the tires on the tractor (in a 5 acre patch out of 40
acres), after just one year was down to counting the
heads on fingers and toes and there were no burs
on the tires.
This year we are going to use my mix one time to
get detoxification and trace minerals. After that we
are going to use compost tea and use air to boost
the fungi, etc.
Robert D Bard


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 05, 2005 8:06 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:45 am
Posts: 92
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Thank you very much for your prompt reply. Please forgive me, I'm new, but you mentioned "my mix." I re-read your reply several times but I don't understand what "my mix" is. Please explain.

Thanks!.


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 Post subject: lime and mos on pond
PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 12:55 am 
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 12:45 am
Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
My Mix
I restore pastures and hay meadows. All of the
land has been farmed out in this country due to
over use and chemical fertilizers. Farmers do not
get paid for trace minerals therefore they put non
on the land. The land is therefore sick. Unhealthy
soil = unhealthy grass and produce = unhealthy
animals = unhealthy people. Sixty five % of adult
population has a degerative disease. My small part
at this time to correct the above is to restore hay
meadows, pastures and out neglected garden (do not
have enought time to take care of our own garden).
My mix last year was using seawater as a fertilizer.
This product has 92 trace minerals, bacteria, enzymes,
amino acids (go to www.oceangrown.com for more
info and research by Dr Murray).
I also used liquid humates. These have fulvic acid
that detoxifies (restores fertility and detoxifies the
chemicals that have been put on the land) and adds
trace minerals.
I also used 2 gal of molasses to 10 acres to feed the
"bugs" in the soil. Molasses also adds trace minerals
to the soil, and adds nitrogen to boost growth.
With "my mix" the guality of the grass improved - the
cattle and goat taste test proved that, volume
improved - more hay to the acre. This was less stem
and more leaf. One 22 acre meadow produced 517
more square bales than it had ever produced before.
Also the quality was better as evidenced by the soil
under the round bales was teaming with earth worms
when the bales were removed after 4 to 6 months of
storage. The non restored round bales next to my
bales had almost no life under them after storage.
Also last year I used potassium nitrate to boost
nitrogen, but this year I am going to leave this out
but make the molasses 1 gal per acre instead of 2
gal / 10 acre.
Robert D Bard


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 06, 2005 1:17 pm 
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Joined: Mon Apr 05, 2004 9:45 am
Posts: 92
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Thank you. And thank you, too, for trying to restore what God has given us. I agree that too many people have these diseases because of what they have done to themselves through neglecting the land. I believe He gave us the proper nutrients if we'd only apply them and keep our soils healthy and in turn our bodies. Instead of popping a pill for an ailment/hurt, find out the cause and treat that instead naturally.


Thanks again.


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 1:28 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 06, 2005 4:31 pm
Posts: 10
Location: Rochester,NEW YORK
Hi all

I know this thread is about a month old, but when I read about the pond problem, I thought I should share whats being done here.

Barley Straw has become the product that everyone is using for pond treatments. All the good organic farm supply stores sell it for about $5 a bale. There are also bottled organic liquid concentrates that are a bit more costly.

I honestly can't tell you how the raw barley straw is applied to the pond. I just happened to be looking into barley straw for something else, but everyone kept asking if I had a pond.

The owner of one small supply store was frustrated and told me that he had given all his barley straw away to make room, because he never sold it anyway. But now that it's become such a big seller to pond owners, people ask him all the time if he has any.

Since then, I've noticed it being sold nearly everywhere around here.

Good Luck


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PostPosted: Sun May 29, 2005 3:14 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 9:18 pm
Posts: 1093
Location: McKinney,TEXAS
We use barley straw and/or cornmeal here with great success. Has anyone you know of tried cornmeal in Rochester?
They only work on free-floating algae, not weeds that are rooted to the bottom.
Tony M


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