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 Post subject: Making a new meadow area
PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 2:00 am 
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Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 11:19 am
Posts: 6
Location: Austin,TEXAS
On my land in northern Idaho, I have been clearing a large area of noxious weeds (tansy, knapweed). I would like to convert this area to a meadow of wild grasses, wildflowers, etc. My thought is to till up all existing scrubby grasses and plants, then plant cover crops of nitrogen-fixers for a few years as I apply the soil-building products to build up this soil, then till under these cover crops.

I have been reading on this forum about liquid sprays rather than dry applications of molasses, etc. Any other suggestions for soil-building over a few years? Would sprays be effective on bare soil, or sprayed on cover crops then tilled under?

Thanks.


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 5:03 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 31, 2003 9:18 pm
Posts: 1093
Location: McKinney,TEXAS
Check out H.R.M. and Stockman Grass Farmer organizations and publications for free info. Also, the Noble Foundation in Oklahoma is a great resource. Contact Native American Seed is Junction, TX for excellent advice.
I have been building my soil with liquid compost, seaweed, fish and molasses with excellent results. My process is to create small plots, 25'x25' or so, and hit them hard with native prairie grasses. These will become "nurse plots" for the rest of the pasture.
Tony M


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 31, 2007 10:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 20, 2007 11:19 am
Posts: 6
Location: Austin,TEXAS
Thanks, Tony. I like that idea of the nurse plot.

We have thought this out a bit and realized that spraying is not going to work for us, due to poor access and lack of the right equipment. So—we'll be looking for dry molasses, etc.

I have read in some U of Idaho Extension info to kill all invasive weeds like Canadian thistle with glycosphate (sp?) first, or else they will take over. We do have purple knapweed and have been eradicating tansy for years. This might prevent us from doing the nurse plot technique. It might just get re-invaded.

I'll check out the resources you mentioned. Although our land is in Idaho, we live based in Austin so heard the Dirt Doctor driving through Dallas.


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 Post subject: making a meadow
PostPosted: Fri Feb 09, 2007 9:12 pm 
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Joined: Sat Apr 12, 2003 12:45 am
Posts: 420
Location: Whitesboro,TX
I would rent goats if you have enough land to feed
them for a few weeks. there are people that have
goats trained to electric fence. They put a temporary
electric fence and then let the goats "pig" out.
You did not say how many acres you have but liquid
molasses and sprays are always easier and more
cost effective unless you are on the side of a steep
mountain or big boulders. You can buy organic liquid
molasses at farm stores. Here in north TX we have
two sources for molasses. Liquid humates are always
a good choice since it helps detoxify past chemicals
plus adds some trace minerals. Be careful of dry
molasses becasue most of it is made with soy bean
hulls. As you may know that well over 85 % of soy
is Genetically Engineered (modified). The chance of
getting dry molasses with out GMO's is almost
impossible. Also with dry molasses it will take a
massive amout to do much good becasue a 50 lb
bag of molasses has less than a gal of molasses.
I like the ideas of small plots. This would be like
sprigging grasses and then let each on spread and
fill in. Great idea - Tony.
I think spraying pesticides and herbicides probably
always casues a death of some person, child, or pet.
It isn't worth the risk when other things work better
and do not have any risk involved with damaging
the environment
Robert D Bard


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PostPosted: Sat Feb 10, 2007 5:00 pm 
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Joined: Sat May 10, 2003 5:48 pm
Posts: 806
Location: Weatherford,TX
I agree with Robert & Tony but I want to clear something up that Robert said. The dry molasses I've seen in my area is 30% molasses which comes to 15# per 50# bag. 15# is almost two gallons. Having said that, I would still recommend the liquid as it is more economical especially for large areas. The dry is easier/quicker to apply on smaller lawns although you need to make sure when buying that it is dry & free flowing. If it absorbs moisture, it will clump & be a big pain to spread.

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