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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 6:31 pm 
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I know there are many many factors and many varieties and so on, but I just need a very very rough, ball-park estimate of how many months a tomato plant will produce tomatoes, and when it will die.

Now I am in Zone 9b and I've got indeterminate tomatoes: Indigo Blue Berries - Cherry Tomatoes, this kind specifically: http://www.territorialseed.com/product/ ... pring_2014

It says 75 days, I believe from transplanting, and I transplanted them second week of March, a little over 2 weeks ago. So I believe in roughly 60 days, it should start producing. I am a complete newbie and this is my first time. If it does produce in two months, in June, how long will it produce for? A month, two months, until December? I have no idea!

Also, how many pounds of tomatoes per plant could I very roughly, ball-park maybe expect? I know, many many factors and it's a strange variety, but on average, with your usual cherry tomato plants, how many pounds might they produce in their lifetime?


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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2014 10:38 pm 
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Indeterminate means that they produce all season. Tomatoes will flower fairly young and you'll see plants that are sometimes only 6 - 8 inches tall with little tomatoes on them and they'll be ready sooner than the 60 - 75 days you read. The plants will continue to produce until it gets too hot for pollination (once the nights don't cool below 80 degrees they shut down). Sometimes if they stuck around after the hottest part of summer you can get a crop in the fall, but a lot of people put in a new batch of plants in August or so for a fall crop.

If you plant determinate tomatoes then they produce the whole crop at once and when they are ripe that is it, no more new tomatoes.

Watch your plants and you'll see the small tomatoes soon after flowers appear and you'll be able to watch them grow then develop that first rosy blush before ripening, and you'll figure out the process.

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