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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2004 7:09 am 
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Hi I have I large quantity of liquid molasses and I need to convert it to dry powder is it possible ?????
Thanks in advance


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PostPosted: Tue Jul 27, 2004 9:39 am 
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Why?

Dry molasses powder and liquid molasses are NOT equivalent.

Dry molasses is normally sold as a cattle feed supplement. It is made from liquid molasses sprayed and dried over a grain roughage flour like rice, millet, corn, etc.

Liquid molasses is a powerful biostimulant, carbohydrate, microbe food, loaded with many nutrients including potassium, iron, and iodine.

Dry molasses is a fertilizer/soil amendment that contains both carbohydrates and some protein in it from the grain flour.

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 Post subject: Re:????
PostPosted: Wed Jul 28, 2004 12:31 am 
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First I wont to thank you for your response.
I have 25 tons of liquid molasses that has come into contact with some chemicals substances and can only be used as dry molasses (animal feed) so if you can tell me more about how to convert it into dry molasses or maybe give me some link where I can find how the whole process is conducted I ll appreciated.


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 Post subject: liguid to dry molasses
PostPosted: Fri Jul 30, 2004 12:20 am 
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What are the chemicals? Probably be better to sell to company that makes dry molasses with correct equipment rather than make do stuff.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject: re
PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2004 12:01 pm 
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I'm involved in a small project in Macedonia here they don't have a company that makes dry molasses so export to another country is expensive.
I don't know what are the chemicals I was told that the only way not to dump it is to make it dry for animal feed so please if you can help me with the process of making dry molasses they will appreciate your effort.
They have equipment for all sorts off tings so maybe they can produce it (I hope so!)


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PostPosted: Sat Jul 31, 2004 1:44 pm 
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If you have 25 tons of contaminated molasses, I would mix that with 75 to 100 tons of rice hulls, ground/dried corn cobs, or any other useless organic crop chaff you have laying around. That's about the proportion they use to make dry molasses. Just pour it on and stir it up.

Don't you kind of need to know what chemicals you are feeding the animals? If it is not safe to spray on soil, how can the animals eat it? I think I would go to great lengths to find out what the chemicals were. Then I would probably spray it on the soil and let the soil microbes deal with it. You absolutely cannot dump it in a stream or you will have massive fish kill. The molasses will overstimulate the bacteria in the stream and they will suck all the oxygen out of the water, thus killing the fish. [/quote]

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 Post subject: liquid molasses to dry
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 12:16 am 
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Would you eat this molasses. If the answer
to this is no then why would you feed it to
your animals. There is enough toxic wastes
being put into fertilizers and called safe. We
don't need more. Read "Fatal Harvest" by
Duff Wilson and then decide if you want
lead, mercury, cadmium, etc in your fertlizer
and/or your food supply.
Robert D Bard


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 Post subject: re
PostPosted: Tue Aug 03, 2004 4:04 am 
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Thanks for you?re concerning but people here care about the animals; it?s not dangerous for them.
These "chemicals" are used for production of animal feed and it will be a great financial loss if it s used for organic farming this is why I need to dry it, to cover their losses.
Thank you very much for your help on this matter, I have one more question to ask;
After ?I would mix that with 75 to 100 tons of rice hulls, ground/dried corn cobs, or any other useless organic crop chaff you have laying around. That's about the proportion they use to make dry molasses. Just pour it on and stir it up? To make it dry to approximately 5% humidity I would need to expose it to some heater but what is the max temperature that it should be exposed.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 05, 2004 11:02 pm 
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marjan wrote:
Hi I have I large quantity of liquid molasses and I need to convert it to dry powder is it possible?


As already discussed, one path is to coat a fine-textured, dry substrate with the liquid molasses. That probably will require a mixing/blending device to prevent clumping and ensure consistent coating. Depending on how it is done, the condition of the ingredients, and the final product's intended use, you might have to dry the coated product. Commercial dry molasses products in the U.S. typically have a maximum moisture content of maybe 5-8%, which probably requires the manufacturers to dry it before bagging. If you have mixing equipment, but not drying equipment, I suppose it is possible to sun/solar dry the mixture after blending it, depending on time constraints. Perhaps you could blend the dried product lightly to relieve excess clumping. Molasses is exposed to fairly high temperatures during production, so one would think that anything short of an oxidizing temperature is feasible. Drying temperature and duration likely have an effect on the end product's characteristics, though. As for pitfalls, I imagine mold is a consideration, depending on the circumstances.

Another option that might or might not be available to you is to use the liquid product to make feed blocks. A typical feed block might contain 45-55% liquid molasses, a binder at about 15%, some water for premixing the binder, a protein source, usually urea, in the 5-15% range, and/or a mineral supplement. The blocks can be sun-dried or air dried, but sun drying is faster. This raises the issue of making home-made lick blocks to supply herbal products or maybe even items such as diatomaceous earth to free range livestock. It appears feasible to me. The quantity of liquid molasses you have equates to a lot of feed blocks. Here's one Australian reference for making feed blocks: http://www.cipav.org.co/lrrd/lrrd15/3/mill153.htm

A third option is to make a "soft" pelleted feed or "range cubes" in which molasses is used as an ingredient/binder for the pelleted feed mixture. I don't think the molasses would require special drying beyond that used for the pelleting/forming process, if any, depending on the molasses content. Of course, if the molasses can be used at the feeding point, it could be mixed with the feed immediately before feeding. A more specialized use is to add the liquid molasses to a dry silage substrate with a very low sugar content before ensiling it.

I'm not sure offhand if one can granulate liquid molasses to a "pure" dry powdered state. Molasses typically is about 50% sugars, but the other solids apparently make it difficult to crystallize. From your description, it seems your molasses might be higher quality than the last boil blackstrap that most feed-grade molasses is, so it might dry down better than would blackstrap. You could try it and see. It seems that economics favor the coated substrate approach we mentioned, though. Good luck!

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Last edited by Enzyme11 on Sat Aug 07, 2004 5:04 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2004 12:35 pm 
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Hello Where can I find liquid molasses I have check with all the big feed store and feed mills in SE Oklahoma most have it but are not able to sell 50 gallons of it. They said they have no way of measuring it out.
One company said they sell me a tanker full but I do not need that munch. I have 2 plastic 50 gallon barrels that Pepsi came in. I have read some where you can buy it for a $1 per gallon. I would like to try 50 to 100 gallon on 50 acres


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PostPosted: Fri Aug 06, 2004 1:02 pm 
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If you can't find farm grade liquid molasses or "deer molasses" at any farm feed stores or garden centers or outdoors supply stores, try the grocery store.

I have made fairly decent aerobic compost tea recipes out of various cheap sugars and corn syrups from cheap discount stores. All sugars are bacterial foods for tea brewing or composting. You only need a little bit per gallon of tea for brewing.

Fungal foods are more complex sugars or starches or carbs like in seaweeds, rotten fruit -less citrus, wood based compost, leaf mold, or just good rich forest dirt.

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