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 Post subject: Japanese Beetles
PostPosted: Sun Jun 22, 2003 9:37 pm 
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I've got Japanese Beetles on my property here in Nashville, TN.

The are not only eating the fruit off my trees, but they are eating the leaves off my fruit trees as well. Of course, they are also mating through all of this.

I've just applied Garrett Juice two days ago, but have had no results ... and I did apply the 2 oz. of orange oil per gallon of juice.

One thing that is unfortunate is that we've had so much rain here that I haven't been able to keep up with my monthly treats of Garrett Juice. I'm sure that if I had, I would be in much better shape.

I've heard of using special traps for catching the beetles, but was warned by an old-timer that if I use them I attract ALL the beetles in the area, not just on my property. He suggested that I only use the bag traps if other neighbors have the beetles.

Any suggestions?

I've got to act fast because these little dudes do a lot of damage in very little time.

I also know that I need to get my Beneficial Nematodes happening. I can't find anyone in the area that sells them and would prefer NOT to mail order them because of the need for temperature regulation during transport.

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PostPosted: Mon Jun 23, 2003 3:38 pm 
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The people who ship beneficial nematodes know of the temperature problems and will ship accordingly. If you can send chickens in the mail, surely you can send beneficial nematodes.

You can safely trap Japanese beetles on your property without attracting them all to your place. Everyone with a porch light is attracting the beetles, so you will be no different than anyone else. If you can set traps on your neighbor's property, or get them to do it, maybe you can actually make a serious dent in the beetle population. Here's how to trap them...

Get a 5-gallon bucket half full of soapy water. Hang a light above the bucket and turn it on at dusk. In the morning go out and collect thousands of beetles and dump them into the compost pile. Repeat nightly until you get no more beetles. Every beetle in your trap is not laying eggs in your yard.

This same trap works for chipmunks except you bait it with sunflower seeds floating on top of the water INSTEAD of soap. You have to make a little plank over to the top of the bucket so they can see the seeds floating there. If you put soap in there, the seeds may not float. I suspect a larger version of this trap would work for squirrels, too.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 11, 2003 10:14 am 
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Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Peanut butter was the bait that got the gnawing rodents in bucket and water traps in the part of the country I'm from (the Pacific Northwest). First unfasten the bail and put an emptied small can over the bail, then refasten the bail to the bucket. Try to prop the bail so it is stationary. If the can has a hole punched in the center of each end (don't open it with a can opener) so that it slips over the wire bail and rotates freely, you are set. A tomato sauce can (the 4 oz size) is perfect.

Smear peanut butter on the sides of the can, and as suggested above, run a little ramp from an adjacent surface to the peanut buttered can (a 1-gallon paint stir stick, shortened if necessary, is a good size for this).

My wilderness guard friends who used this technique in backcountry shelters said it worked well, but would have to get up in the middle of the night to empty the bucket once the splashing stopped. It meant there were too many critters floating in the bucket and the late arrivals could climb out over them.

Not a politically correct approach to wildlife management in the backcountry, granted. I'm just reporting the techniique. :)


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PostPosted: Thu Jul 17, 2003 12:24 pm 
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What would you recommend as a good natural, quick, knock-down remedy against Japanese beetles, to use in accordance with traps?

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PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2003 11:08 pm 
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Location: Prosper, TX
For long term control try Milky Spore.
Milky Spore is a naturally occurring bacterium that affects up to 40 species & genera, including June beetles, Japanese beetles and certain other common lawn grubs. Begins working on application wherever grubs are feeding. After Milky Spore has built up in the soil, infected beetle larvae will die and decay in 14-28 days, releasing billions of new spores into the soil. This process will continue until the soil is saturated. Once the grub population is destroyed, Milky Spore will remain dormant and viable, ready to go to work should new grubs appear. Warm climates can achieve complete control in 2 years with 2-3 applications per year; colder areas may require 3 to 5 years for full control. Once established, Milky Spore lasts for 15 to 20 years. Milky Spore is not affected by freezing, heavy rain, fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides and may be applied along with these or other materials. Harmless to plants including food crops and pasture lands. Harmless to humans, pets, birds, fish, beneficial insects, ponds, streams or well water.

If you have problems finding the product go to www.agorganics.com and look under the Insect Control Section. You can buy the product online.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jul 19, 2003 11:09 pm 
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Joined: Wed Apr 23, 2003 10:54 pm
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Location: Prosper, TX
For long term control try Milky Spore.
Milky Spore is a naturally occurring bacterium that affects up to 40 species & genera, including June beetles, Japanese beetles and certain other common lawn grubs. Begins working on application wherever grubs are feeding. After Milky Spore has built up in the soil, infected beetle larvae will die and decay in 14-28 days, releasing billions of new spores into the soil. This process will continue until the soil is saturated. Once the grub population is destroyed, Milky Spore will remain dormant and viable, ready to go to work should new grubs appear. Warm climates can achieve complete control in 2 years with 2-3 applications per year; colder areas may require 3 to 5 years for full control. Once established, Milky Spore lasts for 15 to 20 years. Milky Spore is not affected by freezing, heavy rain, fertilizers, insecticides or pesticides and may be applied along with these or other materials. Harmless to plants including food crops and pasture lands. Harmless to humans, pets, birds, fish, beneficial insects, ponds, streams or well water.

If you have problems finding the product go to www.agorganics.com and look under the Insect Control Section. You can buy the product online.


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