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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 7:58 am 
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Location: Euless,TEXAS
The school I work at has some vines growing out back that have small yellow fruit growing on them. About 2" and light stripes. They smell like cantaloupe and are full of small seeds. I do have pictures of them but wanted to be sure I post them in the right section. I will just post the picture of the fruit for now. Please delete if this is not correct.
Thanks


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:14 am 
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What do they taste like? Is there a compost nearby that the seeds might have come from?

You might try taking a sample of fruit and vine over to your state agriculture extension office or a local nursery, if you don't get an answer here.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:23 am 
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Well I was not to sure about tasting them. It is growing wild along the sidewalks and parking lots. No compost around but I am told they are all over this area (just outside of Kaufman Tx). I did a small taste of the juice and it has a watermelon rind flavor. One person found one of the fruit ripe at about 4" long.


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 8:49 am 
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The typical wild melon/gourd in the Southwest (not just in Texas) is the "coyote melon" - but I've never cut a fresh one open to see what it looks like before it dries out.
This opens a Google search that I think is pretty conclusive that your plant is a coyote melon. There are a variety of sub-species, you'll see variation in the leaves.

You'll find a lot of information of you google "Coyote Melon edible" - like this http://extension.usu.edu/rangeplants/htm/coyote-melon-gourd/

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:45 am 
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Here is what the vines look like on these


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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 9:54 am 
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I think it's safe to say they are coyote melons. In the fall when you drive on backroads (I'm thinking of the drive from Fort Worth to Amarillo, but it applies all over) you'll see miles and miles of these plants sprawled on the verge on either side of the road. They get a bit more water at the edge of the pavement so are more prolific there.

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PostPosted: Wed Jul 11, 2012 10:26 am 
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That is good to know. Thanks for taking the time to help me with this!
Mark


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