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 Post subject: Hello.....I'm new
PostPosted: Mon Sep 06, 2004 5:33 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2004 5:26 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Central Texas
Hi everyone. I just heard about your site from a friend of mine from another discussion board. My sister and all 3 of my nephews were killed in a house fire in their home 2 weeks ago and my mother passed away in March this year. They are all buried in the same cemetary side by side. Anyway, I don't have too much of green thumb but I was wondering what kind of trees would survive this horrendous Texas heat but provide some nice shade. Won't be too messy. Any help would be greatly appreciated!!!

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2004 5:34 pm 
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Joined: Mon Sep 06, 2004 5:26 pm
Posts: 2
Location: Central Texas
Well, my idea of "messy" is like crepe myrtles and flowering type trees. They have trees like magnolias growing there in other sections and all kinds of the crepe myrtles. I did see a couple of the sage brush plants which do pretty well in the Texas heat....but I'm looking more for good shade. I don't know how the trees out there do in the fall and winter....but it's a very tidy cemetary.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 09, 2004 3:19 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
The Shantung maple is a fast growing adapted tree that seems to do well here in Texas. It will create good shade relatively quickly if planted and cared for properly. Most fast growing trees are short-lived, but the shantung maple is an exception.

If you need a great resource for guidance in tree selection, I recommend checking out the book "Texas Trees" by Howard Garrett. It includes the various characteristics of trees found growing in Texas. In addition to trees that do well here, it also tells which trees to avoid.

See the following for tips on tree care:
http://www.dirtdoctor.com/view_question.php?id=130 If you wish, you can even print out a copy and give it to the groundskeeper. Establishing a good relationship first is ideal. :wink:

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The Laws of Ecology:
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PostPosted: Wed Oct 13, 2004 8:14 am 
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 11:59 am
Posts: 15
Location: Argyle,TEXAS
I'm truly sorry to hear of your losses. My brother died in 2000 and the little cemetary where we buried him allowed us to plant smaller trees. He always loved redbuds so that's what I put there. It doesn't grow very tall, but is nice and tidy and very pretty in the spring (when he died). You'll need to water it as necessary for the first year and then it would survive the heat just fine. I wish you strength and always remember the good times.


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