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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 1:18 pm 
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That sounds involved and expensive. Is simply mowing or trimming the suckers not an option? What kind of trees are coming up in your yard? (My neighbor has a crepe myrtle that kept suckering on my side of the fence and I finally let it grow. I mow any new suckers and trim around the main plant--it's lovely!)

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PostPosted: Sat Aug 15, 2009 6:28 pm 
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Every region has types like that, native or introduced. Plant one and it won't stay just one.

I have native hackberries (oak family) growing around my fence line, and if I left them alone, I'd have a forest of them. Anything other than mowing, hitting with the string trimmer, and lopping off bigger ones would be expensive and probably toxic to that area of the yard. If that isn't going to do it, then your barrier sounds like the best approach.

This is just an educated guess: a barrier like you suggest has been used down here by cities to keep roots from pushing up sidewalks or streets when planting street trees. A dozen years ago when I helped promote a street tree program in my neighborhood the City of Fort Worth was doing that with panels of 1/4" to 1/2" plywood, it didn't need to be a metal barrier. They were placed adjacent to the tree, the depth about 2-3 feet to force the roots down and away from the zone directly under the paved surface. They were plywood because after they broke down it wouldn't matter, the tree in question would have deep roots and not need a further barrier.

So how deep are the poplar roots? How far down would a barrier have to go before the roots that grow beneath it stay low, not becoming suckers or rhizome type surface roots? How established are the suckers in your yard already? If you put in a barrier you'd still need to keep the existing roots down until they die off.

My back aches just thinking of the work it is going to take to dig that kind of trench, especially if it is full of tree roots already! This is kind of the opposite of the Robert Frost poem "The Mending Wall." The trees in your neigbhor's yard will attack the trees in yours. :( A good fence (with a deep concrete footer) would make for better neighbors. Maybe you need a deep concrete-filled trench along the property line.

Good luck!

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PostPosted: Sun Aug 16, 2009 9:57 am 
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From one 50-something woman to another, good luck! I've been here 7 years and have done all of the heavy lifting myself!

Before, March 2002 (taken by a friend long before I had a digital camera):

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This June, 2009:

Image

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PostPosted: Mon Aug 17, 2009 10:15 am 
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I think I've posted some tips for that somewhere around here in years past.

What kind of camera do you have, and does it have a cable or a memory card? Do you have software that came with the camera, or something like Photoshop Elements?

I suppose I ought to write something here one of these days. The questions about this come up fairly regularly (I run a long blog-like thread over in the blog section of the website, where a lot more of my photos are linked).

There are a lot of online places to park photos; Flickr is big, but I've been using Photobucket for a while and am very happy with it. A program from Google like Picasa is downloaded into your computer and it indexes all of your images (once you tell it where to find them) and is great for managing and organizing your photos, and I think they now have a Picasa web site for sharing photos. Photobucket has some editing software, so I'm sure Flickr and the other sites do also. Always keep a copy of the raw images in files somewhere on your computer and plan to copy and work on them elsewhere.

It isn't a question of not having enough choices or information about managing your photos, it's a matter of having too many choices. You have to make decisions about how you want to manage them and then learn how to do it. ;-)

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