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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2003 12:56 pm 
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Location: Salado
I always think how my purchasing choices affect the environment. For example, since I grow most of my veggies I don't need petrol to ship it to me and plastics/paper to package it. I am always looking for more ways to trim my affect on the environment though. I was wondering what you guys do to help the earth!? You know, like tiny, everyday decisions that certainly add up!


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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2003 1:30 pm 
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amodekraft-
Here's one from left field. Do you have room for a couple of secret hens in your backyard. Bug control, no need to buy eggs, fertilizer, companionship and mental health. Throw in a few laughs also.
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PostPosted: Mon Aug 25, 2003 9:31 pm 
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Location: Garland, Texas
amodecraft,

Excellent proactive thinking. I agree that small, seemingly inconsequential, actions add up to the benefit of our earth.

O Seeking cleaning products that are low impact (ie. biodegradeable and the least caustic).
O Purchasing products in containers that can be reused or recycled.
O Bringing your own grocery bags.
O Composting to reduce landfill usage, and waste treatment resources.
O Cutting back on the watering of lawns and gardens. No, you won't have the greenest lawn on the block during the hotter dryer periods. So what?

This list can go on, but I'll leave some for others.

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PostPosted: Fri Aug 29, 2003 10:04 pm 
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I would hate to see this thread wither...

OK, years ago I switched to the soap and brush and quit tossing shaving foam/gel cans. I now enjoy closer and smoother shaves, shaving soaps last longer and the only thing that goes into the trash is the small paper wrapper from around the soap.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 02, 2003 12:36 pm 
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Location: Austin
Mr Clean hit a bunch of the ones I normally think of, I kinda had to stretch to think of some more. Some small, some not-so-small

Take a mug to work, so you don't have to use paper cups

Get your hair cut in a style that you can let air dry and skip the blowdryer

Get a clothesline outside or hang up some of your clothes inside to dry. You save the energy from the dryer, you don't heat up your house, and your clothes last longer :)

Don't buy all the latest gadgets -- stick with your old computer or cell phone so that they don't just end up leaching nasty chemicals into a landfill

Keep your old car, as long as it is reasonably gas efficient. We use up a lot of energy and resources in new cars

Those last 2 ideas fall into the general category of simply using less. I've found my environmental ethic works well with my penny-pinching credo -- and I save enough money on some of this stuff that I don't feel guilty splurging on organic produce and free-range meats ;)

Judith


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 Post subject: Non-toxic chemicals
PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2004 1:19 pm 
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Location: Chattanooga, TN
I switched every product in my home to non-toxic. I mean soap, shampoo, cleaning supplies, lawn products, vitamins (many contain tar!), etc.

The 2nd leading killer of children today is poisoning--usually by dish soap.

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"Clearing toxins from homes makes families healthy" I did it, and my migraines are gone!


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PostPosted: Wed Feb 04, 2004 2:18 pm 
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OldSmellyBloomers - Welcome to the forum(s) and thank you for resurrecting this thread.

Come on forumites...what have you done lately? 8)

horseranch wrote:
Take a mug to work, so you don't have to use paper cups

Get your hair cut in a style that you can let air dry and skip the blowdryer

Get a clothesline outside or hang up some of your clothes inside to dry. You save the energy from the dryer, you don't heat up your house, and your clothes last longer :)

Don't buy all the latest gadgets -- stick with your old computer or cell phone so that they don't just end up leaching nasty chemicals into a landfill

Keep your old car, as long as it is reasonably gas efficient. We use up a lot of energy and resources in new cars
Judith


Judith, Excellent post.
Number 1 - Check
Number 2 - Check
Number 3 - I don't have a clothesline, but I do try to avoid over drying clothes, instead allowing some to finish their drying cycle air drying on a hanger. This is perfect for those shirts which I end up ironing.
Number 4 - Great idea, but don't send your old computers and cell phones to the landfill. Recycle them.

If the computers are still working, some non-profits may accept them. If they are not working there are recyclers which will dispose of these in an environmentaly responsible manner. The computer monitors especially may contain some fairly nasty chemicals.

If your cell phone(s) still work, some women shelters will accept these for dispersal to battered women who cannot affort phone service. Usually they are only capable of dialing 911. If they are not working, check with the same recyclers which take computer hardware.

Number 5 - Check

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 05, 2004 10:44 am 
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Location: Zone 4 South Dakota
Lets see, for starters, I reuse Gatorade and/or bottled water bottles. Either they are refilled with filtered water from my Brita pitcher or I buy Gatorade in a big canister (dry ) and make my own for me and the kids during their sports activities.
Dry clothes outside on the clothesline whenever possible, and have a "drying rack" inside during the winter months to dry clothes.
I bring a thermos of hot water with me to work to make instant oatmeal (in a reusabe dish) or hot tea throughout the day (in my own mug from home)
During the winter, I open the curtains/blinds during the day to let the sun shine in and heat the house, and close them at night and during the summer I keep curtains/blinds closed during the day (and sometimes at night also) to keep out the sun and heat.
When the weather is above freezing, I walk the kids to school and myself to work and back home afterwards. Good exercise, saving gas and reducing fuel smog, saving $$$$, and a good time to talk with my kids.
I grow many of my own vegetables and can, dehydrate, freeze them during the appropriate time. Alot better for you and saves $$$. Need a bigger garden next year though.
Oh, one other thing I can think of-I quit buying expensive corrosive chemical cleaners and went to using baking soda, washing soda, perfume free soap, vinegar and such to clean the house. Works well for me and it (now everybody together) saves $$$$.
and I vermicompost (worm compost) in my basement all the produce scraps especially during the winter when my outdoor compost pile is under snow.
I try buying things with the least amount of packaging, but where I live in this small town, it is hard to do. We don't have a health-food store where things can be bought in bulk.

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PostPosted: Thu Feb 19, 2004 7:40 am 
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One source for organic/green bedding, clothing, and household items:

http://www.ahappyplanet.com

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In theory, theory and practice are the same; in practice, they aren't -- lament of the synthetic lifestyle.


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PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:12 am 
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I found this site:

http://www.dharmatrading.com/html/eng/1908-AA.shtml

and ordered some. Maybe someone on the forum knows who the manufacturer, presumably somewhere in the Texas panhandle, is.

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In theory, theory and practice are the same; in practice, they aren't -- lament of the synthetic lifestyle.


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 24, 2006 6:10 am 
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Hi all,

I have just joined you as moderator and wanted to keep people thinking about how to minimize their impact with simple (or MAYBE big) everyday practices.

So here are my two that I see as some of the easiest and best ways to help reduce waste:

1. Consolidate your driving trips and learn to shop close to home when possible.

2. Don't throw away food (or let your kids). 75 years ago, people taught their kids to 'clean' their plates. Now with the serious obesity problem in America, people have no problem throwing a large part of their meal in the trash. Unfortunately it is in style and people think it is showing self-control. Instead try to serve smaller portions, serve and cook with fresh unprocessed quality organic ingredients, and serve seconds if someone 'cleans' their plate and is still hungry. This is escpecially important to teach our kids.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2006 12:44 pm 
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stuckinsouthdakota wrote:
Lets see, for starters, I reuse Gatorade and/or bottled water bottles. Either they are refilled with filtered water from my Brita pitcher or I buy Gatorade in a big canister (dry ) and make my own for me and the kids during their sports activities......I try buying things with the least amount of packaging, but where I live in this small town, it is hard to do. We don't have a health-food store where things can be bought in bulk.


Be careful about re-using the plastic bottles. After time, the plastics break down and get into whatever it is that you are drinking. Heat and light are two things that will speed this process up. It is best to use glass and just be a little more careful. If you must use plastic, find refillable containers designated with "#5 PP" or "#2 HDPE" or "#4 LDPE".

See: http://www.mercola.com/2005/apr/27/plastic_bottles.htm and just do a google search on your own for the dangers many plastics can have on the foods in which they are stored. It is never a good idea to heat things up in plastic, either.

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The Laws of Ecology:
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PostPosted: Tue Feb 14, 2006 4:52 pm 
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Great point Nadine.

For school lunches and for in the car, we buy Perrier bottles (the little green glass ones) or small glass Lakewood organic juice bottles. These are great to refill with filtered water and use over and over.


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