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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2003 9:41 am 
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Posts: 1
Since I am fairly new to the forum, and have not seen anything on the FAQ's in regards to my question...

Sunday's program talked about the benefits of naturally raised cattle and the meat products from that form of ranching...

They talked about the meat products being distributed to markets, and that the prices may be a bit more (because of rarity, and cost of this type of cattle raising) but the cost is not a real issue...Health is...

I actually am not worried too much about the Mad Cow Disease issue...It is a concern, but I my idea is to eliminate that risk altogether, and to improve our health at the same time...

Background: My wife just had her Gall Bladder removed, and I know that there is not much (if anything) we need to do to adjust our diet, but if I can find a distributor, or grocery market that sells the organically fed and grass raised beef, I feel that is a neat way to solve a few problems we are experiencing today...

I enjoyed the Dirt Doctor program, and intend on listening in every chance I can get from now on...

Regards,
Steve


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 Post subject: Grass Fed Beef
PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2003 10:05 am 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
Steve,
Welcome to the forum. In answer to your question, let me recommend that you contact Jon & Wendy Taggaret at www.burgundypasturebeef.com. They raise their own beef and it is an excellent product. Their cattle are grass fed and they use no herbicides or pesticides on their place, no hormones, etc. They do an excellent job and delivery in the Dallas/Fort Worth area. Your profile does not state where you are but if you are in this area you now know of an alternative.
Kathe


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2003 10:42 am 
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Joined: Mon Apr 21, 2003 12:41 pm
Posts: 92
Location: Austin
Steve,

One way to find grass fed beef is to go to www.eatwild.com; they have a listing many (though certainly not all) of the grass fed producers, organized by state. If you're in the Austin area, I can recommend several, starting with the Alexander Family Farm, http://www.alexanderfamilyfarm.homestead.com. Eatwild also has some great articles about the health benefits of grass fed meats.

Judith


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2003 4:32 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 13, 2003 3:26 pm
Posts: 20
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
For those of us in the Dallas area - I have found that the most convenient source of grass fed meats is from Texas Supernatural Meats. They are at the Dallas Farmers Market. It is a co-op of organic farms including the Rehoboth Ranch- - whose owner, Robert Hutchins was on air with Howard last Sunday.

http://www.rehobothranch.com/

Once you go grass fed you'll never go back - and if you do the difference will be clear immediately.


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PostPosted: Tue Dec 30, 2003 10:26 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
Jenny wrote:
For those of us in the Dallas area - I have found that the most convenient source of grass fed meats is from Texas Supernatural Meats. They are at the Dallas Farmers Market. It is a co-op of organic farms including the Rehoboth Ranch- - whose owner, Robert Hutchins was on air with Howard last Sunday.

http://www.rehobothranch.com/



Mr. Hutchins' operation was profiled this evening on Dallas' local Channel 8 10 pm newscast. Belo owns both Channel 8 TV and WBAP which airs HG's program.

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Keeping it clean and green here, Boss.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2003 12:39 am 
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Joined: Wed May 21, 2003 5:33 pm
Posts: 829
Location: Dallas,TX
And let me add to you that all grass fed, free range meats I have sampled are more nutritious and flavorful. Your body really will feel the difference. Free range poultry and eggs are wonderful. I can tell you from my own experience that eating eggs, meats, organic butter & dairy, etc. has brought me and my family to a high state of health and my former family physician, who constantly teased me about my "alternative" lifestyle, never again said a word to me about my food choices after my first annual exam set of blood tests came back with a total cholesterol reading of just 173. That was three years ago. Join us, friend, and never, ever regret your choice and (as another post stated) you'll never look back.

Good fortune and good health!
:D Kathe


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PostPosted: Wed Dec 31, 2003 10:09 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 06, 2003 10:59 am
Posts: 277
Apropos to this thread and the similar thread on the Pet Care forum. Somehow, I doubt that a fast-food nation that supports this type of confinement/factory farming practice would cry out about anything other than a price hike in their McTumor rations.
+++++++++++++

Wednesday, December 31, 2003
By K.T. Arasu, Reuters

CHICAGO — Murphy Brown LLC, a unit of Smithfield Foods Inc., the nation's largest pork producer, said it uses ground up animal carcasses to feed its turkeys, but would review the practice if there was a "public outcry."

Murphy Brown's statement comes as the Food and Drug Administration considers tightening its ban on feeding meat and bone meal to other livestock as the United States grapples with its first case of mad cow disease.

"We use a minor amount of meat and bone meal from swine and poultry in our feed ration for turkey," Jeff Turner, the Warsaw, North Carolina-based company's vice president for government and environment affairs said on Tuesday, adding that its hogs were not fed with ground up animal parts.

"It's not something we use in huge quantities, but we would take consumers into consideration, because ultimately our goal is to delivery a quality product to our customers," Turner said.

Since 1997, the FDA, which regulates livestock feed, has banned feeding cattle remains to ruminants, including other cattle. Consumption of tainted feed by British cattle has been cited as the cause of the disastrous outbreak of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in the 1980s.

However, U.S. producers are still allowed to feed chicken with meat and bone meal to pigs as a form of cheap protein. The pet food industry also is allowed to use meat and bone meal.

Expectations that mad cow disease would scare poultry and hog producers from meat and bone meal to plant protein sources fueled huge rallies in CBOT soybeans and soymeal last week.

That followed the discovery that a Holstein dairy cow in Washington state that contracted the deadly brain-wasting disease, possibly by eating infected animal feed.

More than two dozen nations have banned U.S. beef, casting a pall over the future of the $27 billion cattle industry, even as experts scramble to trace the source of the disorder that has previously caused financial havoc in Europe and Canada.

"We'll change if there's a public outcry, but we've not seen any consumer outcry yet," Turner said.

Murphy Brown LLC, the hog production arm of Smithfield Foods, raises 8 million to 9 million turkeys and more than 12 million hogs each year, Turner said.

Turner said Murphy Brown was not making any changes to its production in anticipation of increased demand for poultry and pork even as consumers shy away from beef.

"We don't contemplate any change. Ours is a mature industry, obviously," he said. "But we do encourage people to eat more pork."

_________________
In theory, theory and practice are the same; in practice, they aren't -- lament of the synthetic lifestyle.


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PostPosted: Thu Aug 18, 2011 8:22 am 
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Joined: Sun Jul 24, 2011 5:09 am
Posts: 8
Enzyme11 wrote:
Apropos to this thread and the similar thread on the Pet Care forum. Somehow, I doubt that a fast-food nation that supports this type of confinement/factory farming practice would cry out about anything other than a price hike in their McTumor rations.

+++++++++++++



Wednesday, December 31, 2003

By K.T. Arasu, Reuters



CHICAGO — Murphy Brown LLC, a unit of Smithfield Foods Inc., the nation's largest pork producer, said it uses ground up animal carcasses to feed its turkeys, but would review the practice if there was a "public outcry."



Murphy Brown's statement comes as the Food and Drug Administration considers tightening its ban on feeding meat and bone meal to other livestock as the United States grapples with its first case of mad cow disease.



"We use a minor amount of meat and bone meal from swine and poultry in our feed ration for turkey," Jeff Turner, the Warsaw, North Carolina-based company's vice president for government and environment affairs said on Tuesday, adding that its hogs were not fed with ground up animal parts.



"It's not something we use in huge quantities, but we would take consumers into consideration, because ultimately our goal is to delivery a quality product to our customers," Turner said.



Since 1997, the FDA, which regulates livestock feed, has banned feeding cattle remains to ruminants, including other cattle. Consumption of tainted feed by British cattle has been cited as the cause of the disastrous outbreak of mad cow disease, or bovine spongiform encephalopathy, in the 1980s.



However, U.S. producers are still allowed to feed chicken with meat and bone meal to pigs as a form of cheap protein. The nature's select pet food review industry also is allowed to use meat and bone meal.



Expectations that mad cow disease would scare poultry and hog producers from meat and bone meal to plant protein sources fueled huge rallies in CBOT soybeans and soymeal last week.



That followed the discovery that a Holstein dairy cow in Washington state that contracted the deadly brain-wasting disease, possibly by eating infected animal feed.



More than two dozen nations have banned U.S. beef, casting a pall over the future of the $27 billion cattle industry, even as experts scramble to trace the source of the disorder that has previously caused financial havoc in Europe and Canada.



"We'll change if there's a public outcry, but we've not seen any consumer outcry yet," Turner said.



Murphy Brown LLC, the hog production arm of Smithfield Foods, raises 8 million to 9 million turkeys and more than 12 million hogs each year, Turner said.



Turner said Murphy Brown was not making any changes to its production in anticipation of increased demand for poultry and pork even as consumers shy away from beef.



"We don't contemplate any change. Ours is a mature industry, obviously," he said. "But we do encourage people to eat more pork."


have a question came into my mind while reading this one. isnt the pig need a high protein?? why do U.S allow those pet to eat chicken?


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