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PostPosted: Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:33 pm 
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There is a fair amount of data showing that taking a small amount of cinnamon each day aids insulin sensitivity and blood sugar and lipid profiles. Are there any on the forum with Type II Diabetes Mellitus or hb1c levels in the abnormal range that have tried cinnamon, and if so, what has your experience been? For that matter, athletes or dieters who have tested cinnamon chime in also. It's interesting that the phytochemical ingredient of interest, methylhydroxy chalcone polymer, apparently is active when taken orally. There are lots of pieces on the Web about cinnamon's insulin-mimicking effect and its effect on insulin sensitivity, and here are a couple of random ones:

http://www.newscientist.com/news/news.jsp?id=ns99994413

http://www.irontrybe.com/forum/showthread.php?t=6098

http://www.pjbs.org/pjnonline/fin130.pdf

In that vein, just below this post is Edie's earlier post about using Essiac tea as a treatment for feline diabetes.

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PostPosted: Mon May 24, 2004 7:16 pm 
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Hmmmmm interesting…. Could you please post more links to research involving cinnamon and type II diabetes. If you would please use articles published in journals with a high impact factor as I am not well versed in journals of this field.


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PostPosted: Tue May 25, 2004 7:29 pm 
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Location: Saginaw (NW Fort Worth), Texas
Gosh, I wish they could find some way to achieve the opposite effect. I'm technically not diabetic as my GTT tests all come back normal. However, after eating any white sugars (bread, pasta, syrup, dr. pepper) my sugars crash within 45 minutes into the 40s. Awfully hard to live a diet without those items. Any other time I am in the 70s to low 80s.

:roll:
nina

thanks for sharing this info - i will share it with my dad who is typeI since they cut out half of his pancreas a few years ago.


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PostPosted: Thu May 27, 2004 7:37 am 
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nina norman wrote:
Gosh, I wish they could find some way to achieve the opposite effect. I'm technically not diabetic as my GTT tests all come back normal. However, after eating any white sugars (bread, pasta, syrup, dr. pepper) my sugars crash within 45 minutes into the 40s. Awfully hard to live a diet without those items. Any other time I am in the 70s to low 80s.

thanks for sharing this info - i will share it with my dad who is typeI since they cut out half of his pancreas a few years ago.


Most of the references involve Type II, which generally is an insulin resistance concept. Type I generally is the different situation of inadequate insulin production by the islet cells, but I believe that Type I sometimes can involve sensitivity/insulin efficiency issues also. If sensitivity is an issue, then the cinnamon might be worth a try. If I were insulin dependent, I would be very careful to introduce the cinnamon slowly, in small quantities, and in a controlled fashion. A sudden change in efficiency could cause a short term metabolic oscillation that might be hard to manage. If your dad has circulation issues in his extremities, I bet KHWOZ could whip up some ginger soap that might help with that. Here's a link to an interesting piece about diet and non-insulin dependent diabetes (although it would seem to apply somewhat to the insulin dependent state also): http://www.pcrm.org/research/diabetes.html

I believe your situation, which probably falls under the general hypoglycemia umbrella, involves some risk that your cells could become insulin resistant. Because of the feedback system that governs the insulin mechanism, it seems to me that cinnamon possibly could moderate your condition. One way to test it (or maybe merely to demonstrate the placebo effect) is to take maybe a half teaspoon of cinnamon along with, or maybe a half hour before taking, enough of a high glycemic item that ordinarily would crash your blood glucose level, and see what happens. You probably should do that in the presence of someone who can help you if you have an adverse reaction. I would begin with a modest amount of the high glycemic item, and perhaps choose one that usually does not cause the most severe result so as not to overwhelm the effect of whatever amount of cinnamon is involved, then experiment with the combinations and timing. Use no more than one, possibly two, teaspoon(s) of cinnamon per day--high consumption levels apparently can be toxic. I assume you already exercise and observe a diet with a low glycemic index, but for others reading this, that probably is the best way to manage the situation day to day. More broccoli, less of the whites that the DirtDoctor detests.

I believe the cinnamon-insulin connection is being studied now, with more reports to come, but here are some citations from MedLine:

1. Isolation and characterization of polyphenol type-A polymers from cinnamon with insulin-like biological activity., Anderson Richard A; Broadhurst C Leigh; Polansky Marilyn M; Schmidt Walter F; Khan Alam; Flanagan Vincent P; Schoene Norberta W; Graves Donald J, J Agric Food Chem 2004 Jan 14; 52 (1): 65-70

2. Cinnamon improves glucose and lipids of people with type 2 diabetes. [In Process], Khan Alam; Safdar Mahpara; Ali Khan Mohammad Muzaffar; Khattak Khan Nawaz; Anderson Richard A, Diabetes Care 2003 Dec; 26 (12): 3215-8

3. Cinnamon extract (traditional herb) potentiates in vivo insulin-regulated glucose utilization via enhancing insulin signaling in rats. [In Process], Qin Bolin; Nagasaki Masaru; Ren Ming; Bajotto Gustavo; Oshida Yoshiharu; Sato Yuzo, Diabetes Res Clin Pract 2003 Dec; 62 (3): 139-48

4. Glycaemic index of different coconut (Cocos nucifera)-flour products in normal and diabetic subjects., Trinidad Trinidad P; Valdez Divinagracia H; Loyola Anacleta S; Mallillin Aida C; Askali Faridah C; Castillo Joan C; Masa Dina B, Br J Nutr 2003 Sep; 90 (3): 551-6

5. Insulin-like biological activity of culinary and medicinal plant aqueous extracts in vitro., Broadhurst C L; Polansky M M; Anderson R A, J Agric Food Chem 2000 Mar; 48 (3): 849-52

6. The evaluation of long-term effects of cinnamon bark and olive leaf on toxicity induced by streptozotocin administration to rats., Onderoglu S; Sozer S; Erbil K M; Ortac R; Lermioglu F, J Pharm Pharmacol 1999 Nov; 51 (11): 1305-12

7. Regulation of PTP-1 and insulin receptor kinase by fractions from cinnamon: implications for cinnamon regulation of insulin signalling., Imparl-Radosevich J; Deas S; Polansky M M; Baedke D A; Ingebritsen T S; Anderson R A; Graves D J, Horm Res 1998 Sep; 50 (3): 177-82

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PostPosted: Fri Jun 18, 2004 9:04 pm 
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‘I believe your situation, which probably falls under the general hypoglycemia umbrella, involves some risk that your cells could become insulin resistant. Because of the feedback system that governs the insulin mechanism, it seems to me that cinnamon possibly could moderate your condition.’

I have only a rudimentary understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involving insulin, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and glucagon, so could you please explain further. Find this quite fascinating [Yes I am a geek].


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 19, 2004 11:16 am 
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epi 1:10,000 wrote:
‘I believe your situation, which probably falls under the general hypoglycemia umbrella, involves some risk that your cells could become insulin resistant. Because of the feedback system that governs the insulin mechanism, it seems to me that cinnamon possibly could moderate your condition.’

I have only a rudimentary understanding of the regulatory mechanisms involving insulin, somatostatin, pancreatic polypeptide and glucagon, so could you please explain further. Find this quite fascinating [Yes I am a geek].


Well, the idea would be to flatten and/or soften the insulin secretion curve by tricking the system into releasing less insulin and/or releasing it at a reduced rate. The number of variables makes it hard to predict whether the cinnamon would do that for Nina; we don't even know what her current metabolic state is or everything that the cinnamon component does/how it does it, for example. The only way I know to test it for her particular situation is for her to monitor her blood glucose and maybe how she "feels," and that wouldn't be a blind study. I don't suggest cinnamon in place of a low glycemic index diet and proper exercise, but rather as an aid for the odd high glycemic situation. Insulin resistance isn't the sort of fate that I want to taunt. As for the overall insulin-glucagon mechanism, that's a complicated topic suited for individual reading and subject to ongoing change. If you read biochem or endocrine material, that later than ~ 1995 is preferred some because we didn't confirm until about then the mechanism by which insulin acts on the cell. There also has been more work on the lipid/insulin interaction since then. The topic is fascinating, with lots to learn and plenty of unknowns, including the possible effects from the rise in consumption of high fructose corn sweetener since the sugar duties were imposed in the 1980's.

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 Post subject: Diabetes
PostPosted: Sun Jul 04, 2004 1:34 am 
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Location: Whitesboro,TX
We have been working with humates.
We had one pt that had to cut insulin
in half after taking Terratol - humate
for people. I had pt that was allergic
to insulin and he runs 500 to 1000 on
BS (I know - why is he alive) but when
he takes humate his BS runs under 300.
Go to www.enviromateinc.com for more
info.
My website is up but not finished yet but
I will have Terratol available for my
site in the next week or two. www.robertbard.com
I will also have first talk show on Healthy,
Wealthy, Wise on 990 am radio right after
Howard at 12 noon Sunday starting July 11th.
If I can get phone hooked up to my computer
properly I will have an interview with Randy
Mosley who it the owner of einviromateinc
and has been involved with other researchers
using humates.
I have been able to get my tech off her addiction
of "legal" drugs - paxil, xanax etc. Also her BP
was terrible after her child was born and now
it is 125/70 - all using humates.
I have a friend in NM that has been doing work
with this and virus infections and has had some
very promising results.
There is research in Alabama on using humates
to stop cancer cell growth and the results are
very promising.
Humates are made of of fulvic acid and chelated
trace minerals. These have been proven to restore
toxic waste sites and chemical spills and now "cleaning
up peoples waste sites".
Robert D Bard


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