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 Post subject: Recommendation
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 9:33 am 
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Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2003 12:12 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Ennis,TEXAS
I am going to plant 6-8 trees for the front of my property. I am looking for a large tree. I like the Bradford Pear. But, they seem to be over used. I like to be a little different. Any ideas on other trees I could use. Something that changes colors and flowers. I did see some Tulip trees at the nursery the other day. But, I have never herd anything about them before.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 12:57 pm 
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Joined: Fri Apr 04, 2003 1:52 pm
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
I would suggest buying or going to the library and getting Howard's Trees for Texas book. It shows many great options as well as describes the good and bad points of the trees. It also points out spring blooms and fall colors.

I would not suggest Bradford pears because they have a tendency to break easily in ice and wind storms.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 28, 2007 9:01 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2003 12:12 pm
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Location: Ennis,TEXAS
Great idea. I will go and get one tomarrow.


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PostPosted: Fri Mar 30, 2007 10:06 pm 
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Joined: Sun Aug 17, 2003 12:12 pm
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Location: Ennis,TEXAS
Perfect timing. If you ask, you shall recieve. Did you see Howard's artical in the Firday's DMN?


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Mar 31, 2007 7:45 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 7:33 am
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Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
Well, gee, of course we all saw it! :)
Seriously, great advice.
PS-make sure planting instructions are followed. Look in the 'library' here on the home page.

Patty

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Apr 02, 2007 7:22 pm 
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Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2005 6:55 pm
Posts: 286
Location: Saginaw,TX
Dallas Morning News


How about magnolias? Including saucer magnolia or cucumber magnolias.


Tulips trees, also called yellow poplars, are good trees. Though some stated that limbs break off in storms. They have good yellow fall color. They produce flowers, but they are way up there so it is hard to see. They grow 100 ft in eastern forests.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 7:31 am 
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Man, IMO I would never plant more than one magnolia anywhere..and that may be too many. I'm not talking about the deciduous ones. The "evergreen" ones drop huge plasticy leaves everywhere that take forever to compost. What a mess. Of course, just my opinion.

I live with a 50-60ft tall magnolia in my backyard for 15 years by the way. They're pretty but a real mess.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Tue Apr 03, 2007 12:11 pm 
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Joined: Mon Feb 26, 2007 10:45 am
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Location: dallas,TEXAS
different strokes... I adore our mature Magnolia.

I second the Fire Dragon Maple... beautiful tree. Another alternative might be a Kwanzan flowering cherry. The ones I saw blooming in the Ft. Worth botanical garden a few weeks ago were stunning.


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