It is currently Thu Feb 11, 2016 7:04 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri May 16, 2003 6:15 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 16, 2003 5:59 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Haslet, TX
Hello all. We had two Burr Oak trees installed in our yard about 1 1/2 months ago. They grew leaves not long after the planting, but within the last two weeks, the leaves have started turning brown and falling off. We don't know if the trees are dying, or if this is normal, or a sign of a less severe problem. Please help.

Image
Image

I have more pictures if needed.

TIA,
nicole


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 8:19 pm 
Offline

Joined: Fri May 16, 2003 5:59 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Haslet, TX
Since nobody had any suggestions, I took the question to where we bought the trees. They said the browning leaves could be either from extreme wind, which we do get a lot of out here, or from too little water. They also suggested root stimulator since they were fairly large trees they might need a little extra coaxing.
So we made sure to do deep waterings and found some organic root stimulator and applied it on Sunday. On Sunday, we could already see sprouts of new growth on some of the limbs, so were already hopeful of the situation. Now rather than all brown and dead looking, the tree is half full of green leaves again!

I hope this is helpful to someone else.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Jun 04, 2003 8:41 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 8:38 am
Posts: 784
Location: ,
Sorry, this one slipped by- Entwife and I were busy with a brand new Enting.

This sounds like they got a bit of transplant shock. Even trees that aren't keen on alot of water when well established (3+ years in ground) need extra water (maybe an inch per week) the first couple of growing seasons.

Presuming that was a good organic root stimulator (like liquid seaweed) then the trees will probably remain on the road to recovery as long as you don't let them dry out badly this summer. By fall they'll be settling in well and the over-winter rooting underground should give much better groth in the next Spring.

_________________
Shepherd of the Trees
It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields we know so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 3 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife