It is currently Tue Feb 09, 2016 8:05 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Oct 30, 2009 10:30 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 10:23 am
Posts: 4
Help!!! We are moving to San Antonio and the patch of land where we are going has millions of those sticker burrs. We are in our 70s and just cannot crawl around pulling them. PLEASE someone tell us the best way short of burning the area to at least start controlling the blasted things.

Does applications of Corn Gluten help. LOordy show us the way.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 10:17 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1797
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
That's a tough one. I have a few of those in my front lawn in Fort Worth and I've been trying to reduce the number by physically removing the seed heads and putting them in the trash when I see them. Is there any way to mow and catch (bag) and toss the grass to thin the seed production, to start with?

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:09 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 10:23 am
Posts: 4
We have considered the BUT the San Antonio heat and the fact that this plot has been open with no care at all makes it really tough. The plot is nearly solid stickers???


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:36 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1797
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
I suspect that if/when Howard or one of his folks who manage more land answer this, there will be some discussion about that particular plant and the type of soil it needs. My burrs grow commingled in an otherwise healthy mix of turf and next to nice iris beds with good soil, so I don't know that it would be a matter of simply improving the soil to drive out this plant (like with some other plants found primarily in poor soil). I think a mix of picking up the seed heads (there are probably many possibilities--can you hire a neighborhood kid to mow, etc.?) and application of vinegar or other organic products that will discourage the burr growth or to kill the grass before it seeds.

Good luck. I think you'll find that there isn't a one-step kills all of it and leaves the rest alone answer. The chemical companies offer that, but the environmental cost is way too high. That's why we're doing it the organic way, and sometimes working a little harder to get it right.

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 11:40 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 10:23 am
Posts: 4
Thank you so much for all the good word. A neighbor said perhaps a good application of corn gluten and molasses to improve the soil could encourage grass growth which could strangle the burrs plants?????


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 12:45 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1797
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
That can't hurt, and it will make all of the rest of the plants happier. The main question is, will improved soil help crowd out that particular weed or make it healthier?

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Nov 05, 2009 10:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Tue Oct 20, 2009 12:22 pm
Posts: 129
Location: Frisco, Tejas
Define "patch"

Patch: A 1/5 acre plot of subdivision or
PATCH: 40 acres with Mule

If you want a short term cosmetic solution, mow to the ground and plant some rye for the winter. It ain't exactly perfect but it is effective.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 06, 2009 3:44 am 
Offline

Joined: Fri Oct 30, 2009 10:23 am
Posts: 4
Super idea/////Thanks for your input and we will follow your advice..


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 8:23 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Nov 23, 2009 10:56 pm
Posts: 1
Something that worked for us in the past was to take an old nylon blanket and drag it across the area, then throw the old, burr laden blanket away. We did this a few times over a year and the next year we could tell a huge difference.


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Fri Nov 27, 2009 11:06 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator
User avatar

Joined: Wed Jul 02, 2003 8:09 pm
Posts: 1797
Location: Fort Worth,TEXAS
Clever! We usually pick them up more slowly--in our shoelaces and socks. :)

_________________
Northwesterner


Top
 Profile  
 
PostPosted: Thu Feb 18, 2010 1:15 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Tococano has exactly the right idea. Anything that a burr will stick to (any fabric) can be used like Velcro to remove them from the surface. Then you have to deal with the plants. Those burrs are very common down here on soil that is of poor quality. The fastest way to get rid of them is a little compost or mulch followed by organic fertilizer and plenty of water ONCE A MONTH. Don't water too frequently or the remaining burr seeds will sprout. In the heat of summer you can water once a week without worry, but no more than that. The soil has to dry out between watering or the seeds will sprout. Once the soil has a healthy population of soil microbes, the burr plants will die. Growing grass is the ultimate solution. If you treat the soil like you were growing grass, the burrs will die. It's one of those amazing things. Essentially the burrs are Nature's way of telling you that you have poor soil.

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 11 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife