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 Post subject: Fruitless Mulberry Tree--how long do they live
PostPosted: Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:12 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:02 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Fort Worth,Tx
I read in the Dirt Doctor's magaziine that I get each month that fruitless mulberry trees were on the not to plant list. I have one that has been here since we bought our house in 1972. I have been told that they don't live over twenty years. Seems someone forgot to tell the tree that if it is true. Anyway, I was wondering what the reason is for not planting them. I know the roots stay close to the surface. How much longer do I have with this tree? Thank you, Lavenia :D


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 5:18 am 
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Joined: Sun Mar 16, 2003 11:08 am
Posts: 118
Location: Ladonia
Here in Rockwall I know where one has been since 1964 and at that time it looked to be full grown. I believe all trees and plants have a place in the world and I love the shade that they give. They also say on this forum that hackberry trees are trash trees but the cardinals and bluejays love the hackberry tree. Plant what you like. It all has a purpose

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Life is a Garden. DIG IT!!!


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 6:46 am 
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Joined: Sat Mar 08, 2003 8:39 pm
Posts: 532
Location: Lavon,Texas
I agree with carhoods. One persons trash is another persons treasure. What ever works and grows the best for you is what you should plant. I believe any tree that is taken care of properly, with organics, will live a long healthy life, as long as your neighbor doesn't try to kill it with Roundup.

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Greg...
Converting one person at a time to Organics, the only way to go!! [ ME ]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed Mar 31, 2004 8:14 am 
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Joined: Wed Mar 19, 2003 8:38 am
Posts: 784
Location: ,
Well, let's clarify here:

If someone is asking 'Should I plant a fruitless mulberry?' my answer is going to be no, at least in a yard setting. They have very messy and invasinve root systems, they are water hogs, and have weak wood that can easily break and fall on your house or car.

If you have one already and it's not positioned where it could damage something valuable, then no, youdon't need to cut it down or anything. When we moved to our house 3 years ago, I had one cut down immediately, but that was because it was right up against the house. If it's out in the middle of the yard and you can spare the room for it, no biggie.

As to the longevity- any plant or tree is going to do better than average in a property that is maintained with a good organic program.

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Shepherd of the Trees
It is not our part to master all the tides of the world, but to do what is in us for the succor of those years wherein we are set, uprooting the evil in the fields we know so that those who live after may have clean earth to till.


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2004 5:48 pm 
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Joined: Tue Mar 30, 2004 11:02 pm
Posts: 7
Location: Fort Worth,Tx
[color=red ][/color]This tree has been here longer than we have. At one time when my kids were growing up the other parents usually came to my house. If there son's or daughter's bike was under the tree it was pretty certain that they would be up in the tree. Those branches have held up well. Now my grandaughter is starting to climb it. It is here to stay, me & the birds love it! One year I had a hummingbird nest way up high in it. My Aunt has insisted that she has never seen one last more than 20 years. I am glad to know it will be around. We love it. :)


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Apr 03, 2004 9:13 pm 
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Joined: Tue May 20, 2003 4:33 pm
Posts: 526
Location: parker county, texas
When we lived in Ft Worth, we had two in the front yard on the south side of the house. I absolutely loved them. They were stocky, strong trees that provided great shade, and we never watered them. They just got rainwater. The kids loved climbing in them. I now have a grand-daughter, and I'm considering planting one for her to climb in some day. On our present property, we have a female fruiting mulberry. It seems to be much weaker, taller, and is messy, but my personal experience with the fruitless ones has been great.


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