Quantcast
Dirt doctor
 
* Free Registration   * Forum Login Below   * Search    * FAQ   
* User Control Panel     * Members    Translation Translation   








Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next
Author Message
 Post subject: sand burrs
PostPosted: Wed Apr 30, 2003 5:39 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Apr 30, 2003 5:32 pm
Posts: 1
How doI get rid of sand burrs in yard? Heavy concentration in some areas, light in others. [/list]


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2003 12:16 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2863
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
If you have areas of pure sand burrs, use a torch to burn them up. You need to burn the seeds to ashes.

For mixed areas, you are on a journey. Water deeply, mow high (assuming you don't have bermuda), and use corn gluten meal to control the seed sprouts. Deep watering will promote the grass health and drought tolerance. Tall mowing will shade the burr seeds to slow down their sprouting. CGM will control their growth at the seed stage and will kill the sprouts. Don't the burrs sprout all year long? You might need to use the CGM every 3 months for a couple applications until you see some control. If so, you will have some serious fertilized grass out there.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2003 8:59 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 22, 2003 4:52 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Weatherford, Tx
I feel the real key in controlling grass burrs is soil fertility. I naturally use only organic products. Compost, my compost teas, commercial organic fertilizers and dry and liquid humates. Grass burrs are an indicater plant of less than optimum soil.

_________________
Composting can be a dirty job, but someone has to do it!!!!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jun 08, 2003 8:32 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
stetsonfits43 wrote:
...key in controlling grass burrs is soil fertility....dry and liquid humates. Grass burrs are an indicater plant of less than optimum soil.


If you live in town, your neighbors might frown on the burning approach as well may your local authorities. Check with your local municipality regarding ordinances.

Restore the soil to health and you should soon be rid of this nuisance.

Good luck.

_________________
Keeping it clean and green here, Boss.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2003 7:01 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 22, 2003 4:52 pm
Posts: 4
Location: Weatherford, Tx
Mr. Clean wrote:
stetsonfits43 wrote:
...key in controlling grass burrs is soil fertility....dry and liquid humates. Grass burrs are an indicater plant of less than optimum soil.


If you live in town, your neighbors might frown on the burning approach as well may your local authorities. Check with your local municipality regarding ordinances.

Restore the soil to health and you should soon be rid of this nuisance.

Good luck.


I live in the country(parker). I never use fire in yards. I've burned my pasture and around my creek before. This was just to clear everything before I started my organic program. While I didn't really like wasting all that organic matter. I figure it wouldn't hurt all that much since nature has used this method to help form the grasslands of the prairies. I seldom use this method today.

_________________
Composting can be a dirty job, but someone has to do it!!!!!!


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2003 11:45 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 24, 2003 3:53 pm
Posts: 291
Location: Dallas,TX
Grass burrs don't like healthy soil and humic acid. Apply humate (humic acid) in the recommended dosage on the bag... perhaps 50% more if they are a real issue.

It's essentially concentrated, volcanic-based "granular compost" and will do the trick to bring your soil up to speed. Wear old shoes/socks and gloves, because the black residue that accompanies the spreading exercise is a sight to behold... :lol:

_________________
...Bill


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jun 09, 2003 12:06 pm 
Offline

Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
Posts: 747
Location: Garland, Texas
Billusa99 wrote:
Grass burrs don't like healthy soil and humic acid. Apply humate (humic acid) in the recommended dosage on the bag... perhaps 50% more if they are a real issue.

...Wear old shoes/socks and gloves, because the black residue that accompanies the spreading exercise is a sight to behold... :lol:


I wear an old pair of Teva sandals. Afterwards I can just hose myself off. It has also been recommended (right here on this GREAT forum) to mix the dry humate product with lava sand with greatly aids in the application of both products through a spreader (not drop style).

_________________
Keeping it clean and green here, Boss.
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Controlling Grass Burrs
PostPosted: Sat Sep 27, 2003 5:15 am 
Offline

Joined: Thu May 22, 2003 6:06 am
Posts: 1
Location: ,

Would like to know if grass burrs have hard seed. In an area that was under fair control after using corn gluten meal for about three years - this year has seen a mass infestation - thinking possibly the wet spring we experienced germinated the hard seed of previous years. Will be interested on your take on this - Thank you............Roy


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Grass burs
PostPosted: Sun Nov 16, 2003 1:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 10:53 am
Posts: 21
Location: Austin, Texas
I have had lots of experience with these and they can be controlled. Soil fertility is important, but physical removal seems to be key. One plant can produce over 1100 seeds in a year, so think of that each time you dig one up! I have a "Weed Popper" (available at nurseries and home stores) and have used the same one for over 15 years. (It doesn't get much use these days.) This gadget pops the whole plant out of the ground. Works especially well when the soil is soft after a rain. It is also great for dandelions and sow thistle. I would recommend adding compost to the soil this spring if you can afford it and feed the lawn several times a year until the problem is gone. The more you feed, the less healthy and easier to dig the sand burs become. If your grass is very thin and unhealthy it may be a good idea to overseed with annual or perennial rye to build the soil and compete with the grass burs in the spring. These grasses will die when hot weather hits, but you will need to mow it this winter.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: is this a sandbur?
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2003 12:46 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 182
Location: Saginaw (NW Fort Worth), Texas
Can ya'll tell me if this is the sandbur that ya'll are talking about? We grew up calling these things stickers cuz they hurt like a booger when they get stuck in the feet.

Image

This is the link to that photo if it doesn't show up: http://www.ergonica.com/ergonica_frame.htm?Weed_Tips.htm&1


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2003 2:42 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Mon Sep 01, 2003 2:57 pm
Posts: 182
Location: Saginaw (NW Fort Worth), Texas
umm whoops. guess i forgot to get rid of the frame first. sorry. found another photo at - http://www.agriculture.com/default.sph/agNotebook.class?FNC=ArticleList__Aarticle_html___8132___813

i'm not finding any luck controlling these organically, everyone seems to use roundup or some msma junk. :(


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2003 9:11 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Nov 15, 2003 9:17 am
Posts: 15
The only thing I have found is a sharp hoe and gloves. It's hard work but it gets rid of them. I want to try corn meal gluten but I can never remember when to apply it.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Stickers
PostPosted: Thu Nov 20, 2003 11:05 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 10:53 am
Posts: 21
Location: Austin, Texas
MSMA contains arsenic and other nasty stuff and it hurts your trees, grass earthworms and everything else! And to top it off, it doesn't work all that well anyway - you'll still have stickers and a lawn that is in worse shape than ever. Definitely not a part of the organic program.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: grass burs
PostPosted: Sat Jan 17, 2004 10:10 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 17, 2004 9:47 am
Posts: 3
Location: Decatur,Tx
we have grass burs sooo bad, we are thinking about taking the tractor and blade and scraping them off and starting again. After we have bare ground should we use cgm then wait awhile to plant new grass, or plant grass seed then use the cgm after the seeds germinate :?


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: grass burrs
PostPosted: Sat Jan 24, 2004 12:35 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Jun 08, 2003 10:53 am
Posts: 21
Location: Austin, Texas
The grass burrs have gone to seed and died at this time. Scraping the soil as you describe will probably result in even more of the seeds germinating. Is this a lawn? Pasture? Plant grass seeds that will compete with the burrs or do the corn gluten, then plant grass seeds.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 17 posts ]  Go to page 1, 2  Next




Who is online

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 0 guests


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  

Turffalo
 
Spriggs Brothers
 
Azomite
 

   


H A N N A H ' S    M A R K E T P L A C E

Send this website to a friend Make this website your home page
Powered by phpBB © 2007 phpBB Group
Web Site by SpiralFX Interactive, LLC