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 Post subject: molasses
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2004 7:18 pm 
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Location: Hugo,OKLAHOMA
Where do you purchase the liquid molasses? From a feed store? :?:


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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:30 pm 
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I saw it this past weekend at Lowes. I don't recall the price, but I don't believe it was to expensive.

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PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2004 8:46 pm 
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thanks for the info. I appreciate it....very very much..


lp


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 Post subject: Re: molasses
PostPosted: Mon Jan 05, 2004 10:27 pm 
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Location: NYC z7
lplott wrote:
Where do you purchase the liquid molasses? From a feed store? :?:


I asked the same question a few months back. We dont have many feed stores in NYC. Jeez, Lowes isnt around every block in this town either (those of you who live here know why). As I was strolling down the aisle in my local grocery, what do I see next to pancake syrup? You guessed it. Unsulfered too. I didnt get it as I had plenty of honey and I am not hot composting yet. Good to know though.

Fito


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PostPosted: Tue Jan 06, 2004 6:37 am 
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People either need to add their city and state to their profile or let us know where you live, in your post. If not, then we can only suggest stores that we know of in the areas we are familiar with.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2004 10:25 am 
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I have friends who belong to a farmer's co-op in New Braunfels. The co-op sells molasses by the pound at a market rate if you provide the container. Currently it fluctuates from $0.09 to $0.11 per pound. A gallon weighs 10.5 pounds so a gallon costs a little over a dollar at the co-op. I believe it was $7.00 at Lowes.

Not all Lowes have organic supplies. I was visiting my mom in Southern California over the holidays and never did find molasses. I went to every feed, garden, and hardware store in her area. Of course the grocery stores have it but for the price difference, I'll use table sugar.

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PostPosted: Wed Jan 07, 2004 1:31 pm 
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I now can found locally 50 lb bags of dry molasses for around $10.00 and a gallon of "deer molasses" for around $6.00 in my area.

Before I could buy molasses locally in bulk, I used to use cheap boxes of brown sugar.

Now since I've been studying and reading how molasses is more of a bacterial food rather than a fungal food, I think I'm going to use less molasses products in my teas, and use more complex sugars like the ones in seaweed, rotten fruits, old cookies and candy, and old breads, for more fungal growth in my aerobic teas.

I now use some of my aerobic teas to get more H2O, nitrogen, and aerobic microbial growth in my static hot compost piles too.

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PostPosted: Thu Jan 08, 2004 5:45 pm 
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Hey Captain, what is "deer molasses"? Is it a special mix to feed deer prior to hunting season? I have never heard of this product before.

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PostPosted: Fri Jan 09, 2004 8:22 am 
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It's the local nickname for the farm grade liquid molasses that the deer hunters use to buy the stuff by the gallon at the co-ops and farm feed supply stores.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Jan 10, 2004 10:49 pm 
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Bluestem wrote:
Just a warning. Most coop's here in north Texas have molasses. But its mixed with "other stuff" to be used as animal feed. Urea at about 30%. Makes great fertilizer! Not exactly organic though. If anyone knows of a source for plain molasses in north or central Texas please let me know.


Most feed stores/mills probably carry sweet feeds or sweet feed mixes in which molasses is the "sweet." Buyers should check to be sure that the product is not a sweet feed blend (unless they want one).

In the past, I have downplayed the economy and utility of dry molasses on this forum, based in part on a product label that apparently either was inaccurate or was for an unusually dilute product. After reviewing some other product labels and the various states' labelling standards, it seems to me that the average dry product may not be as low in sugar or as poor a value as I may have implied.

A more typical feed grade dry molasses product label might look like this:

Crude Protein...Minimum 4.0%
Fat..................Minimum 0.1%
Fiber...............Maximum 24.0%
Sugars............Minimum 38.0%
Moisture ……....Maximum 6.0%

Based on that label, a 50 lb. bag of that product would contain at least ~ 18 lb. of sugars on a dry weight basis. On that sort of label, the sugars might be a mix of sucrose and invert sugars, which generally includes fructose and glucose, or they may be the invert sugar content only. If it is the invert sugar value only, it is possible that the product could contain some additional sucrose, which would raise the sugar content some. (The labels usually must state a sugar content as invert sugar, but they don't have to state the sucrose content, if any.)

A typical feed grade liquid blackstrap molasses product might contain ~ 43-50% total sugars, depending on the plant source, weigh ~ 12 lb/gallon, and be ~ 24% water. That implies that a gallon of mill-run heavy blackstrap would contain about 5 lb. of total sugars, give or take a little for variations in sugar and moisture content among products. Assuming that the molasses used to make the dry molasses product above is straight heavy mill-run blackstrap that has not been processed further, it seems that a bag of that product would contain the equivalent of maybe 3 1/2 gallons of the mill-run liquid blackstrap (it may be that the amount of blackstrap required to add that much sugar varies depending on what type of dry matter is being coated). If those assumptions and calculations are not too far off, taking into account analysis variations and conversions to dry weight bases, they imply that dry feed molasses may not be a bad value if one doesn't have a cheap source of bulk liquid blackstrap and if a granular form fits the particular need. For garden use, one might prefer the dry molasses product over white sugar if the price per pound of sugar equivalent is fairly comparable. The molasses would have 2 or more different types of sugars, some additional food value, and trace minerals that white sugar would not, but I suppose there's the possibility that the molasses could have more pesticide residues than would the white sugar.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Jan 11, 2004 6:03 pm 
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I checked a bag of dried molasses. I have, and found the following:

Crude Protein.............minimum..........6.00%
Crude Fat...................minimum..........0.50%
Crude Fiber................minimum.........19.00%
Total Sugars...............minimum.........42.00%
Ash............................maximum........11.00%

Cane molasses and roughage products.....30.8%

It sure works good for all the 'extras' included.

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Converting one person at a time to Organics, the only way to go!! [ ME ]


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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 11:57 am 
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Thanks for the analysis of dry molasses. I have always been much more pessimistic about the contents and value of the product. I'll shut up about it now :D

Still, once you open the bag and the humidity gets to the dry product, it hardens into an unusable brick.

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 3:51 pm 
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I'm currently doing some research on cheap ole corn starch. I've been reading how its a great easily digestible fungal food. I believe corn starch is the original product that classic corn syrup is processed from. The starches are broken down into sugars via enzymes.

I think if you add a few tblsp per gallon of tea, of corn starch and less molasses to a good aerobic tea made from a rich bacterial/fungal compost, you should build and grow higher fungal colony counts in the teas.

The grain roughage in dry molasses feed is probably a great fungal food for teas, but the fungi gets overwhelmed by the massive growth populations of the aerobic bacteria because of the easily digestible sugars in the liquid molasses part.

Just a theory....

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 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Jan 12, 2004 9:22 pm 
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Dchall_San_Antonio & Kathe,
The reason I like dried molasses over liquid is because I mix the molasses with humate and cornmeal and spread with a spreader. It is much easier and faster, to cover 1.25 acreas. I currently only have a 1 gallon pump up sprayer. It would take me all afternoon to spray my yard. I plan on purchasing a trombone sprayer but have not had time to track down and pickup it up. It is on my organic list of things to do. When I do get it. I will be able to mix up 5 gallons of compost tea, with liquid molasses, put the bucket in a wagon and pull the wagon around as I spray the yard.
I do agree that the molasses does clump together when the moisture hits it. I just break apart the clumps and spread it. A lot of the molasses I apply to my compost pile by hand. It seemd to heat it up and get it cooking.

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