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PostPosted: Sun Jun 26, 2005 12:34 am 
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Location: Denton,TEXAS
http://www.morningware.com/pd_05.htm

From what I saw on TV they employ UV lamps near the top to kill orders that might otherwise escape out. Specifics limited, and no price listed.


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PostPosted: Tue Jun 28, 2005 9:27 am 
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Cool article.

However what ever happened to the classic, cheap, economical, large rubber or plastic trash cans with a thousand holes all over it for constant aeration, in the modern home or garage? (LOL)

If funky odors are a big deal to the user, all you have to do is make sure you got more browns than greens in the bin, and always put heavy carboneous browns always on top. Carbon is a natural odor eater anyway.

Dry molasses and all other sugary products are also high carboneous organic materials. Especially in various compost tea recipes, the sugars help control funky odors.

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The entire Kingdom of God can be totally explained as an Organic Garden (Mark 4:26)
William Cureton


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PostPosted: Sun Oct 30, 2005 10:59 am 
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This begs a good question. I had to discontinue putting kitchen waste in my compost because my dogs were eating it all. I have a fair output considering there are only three of us, because I do a lot of cooking from scratch. I would like to position a smallish compost bin by my side door (where the dogs can't get at it) that I can easily toss kitchen scraps into for composting. I don't want the smell wafting in every time a door or window is opened.

I happen to have a large hole riddled black plastic trash can that I inherited when I bought the house. If I were to drill more holes in it and keep the lid on, how often would I turn the contents, what amendments would I add to speed it up, and should I water it often? Being black plastic it would catch the sunlight and cook the contents all the faster. What else can you think of that would improve this plan or is there a counter suggestion you can make?

Northwesterner


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 Post subject: In-house composting bins
PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 8:55 pm 
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Location: Robinson,TEXAS
Have you ever thought about worm composting? This is a very good way of disposing of kitchen scraps and provides the richest compost in the form of worm castings. They can be raised in a 10 gallon rubbermaid container. There is a world of information on the web. One good source is WWW.wormdigest.org or Mastercomposters.com.
Richard Spitzer


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PostPosted: Wed Nov 02, 2005 9:54 pm 
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Joined: Sun May 16, 2004 10:52 am
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Location: Frisco, Prosper & Celina, TX
Also check out
http://www.WormWoman.com
IKEA has a vermicompost project going in Illinois.

Author Mary Appelhof recently passed. She was well known for her book "Worms Eat My Garbage", worth looking for if you are interested in the subject.


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