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PostPosted: Sat May 30, 2009 5:24 pm 
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I haave a compost pile that is 3 foot by 3 foot by almost 3 foot high. The temperature gets to about 100 degrees but doesn't seem to get any higher. Any suggestions to get the temperature into the ideal zone?


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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 6:56 am 
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It is all based on the ratio of green material to browns materials, your choice of aeration method, and moisture control.

Are you using any raw manure materials in the mix?
Are you using a lot of grass clippings?
Is the pile kept moist most of the time?

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PostPosted: Wed Jun 10, 2009 4:36 pm 
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The sides of my compost bin are made from hardware cloth. I have been truning it once a week. Here recently it has been getting to 120 degrees. I have not used any raw manure but I do use grass clippings, I normally put a layer on about an inch thick or so. I didn't think that you wanted to use too much grass clippings. As far as moisture, I think it is staying at the right moisture content.

Don't I want it to get to about 160 degrees to kill weed seeds?


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PostPosted: Fri Jun 12, 2009 5:55 am 
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If you can get your internal temperatures up to 140 degrees for at least 3 days you are doing great. That is the normal temperature and time for breaking down most weed seeds and pathogens in a compost pile.

However keep in kind that your lower tempertures will work also. Just let it decompose a few weeks or months longer. Also apply dry molasses products (or any other sugary substance) for greater fungal growth. Fungi and algae and other larger organisms, can grow in lower temperatures than beneficial tempal bacterial in the compost pile.

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William Cureton


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PostPosted: Wed Jan 20, 2010 11:06 am 
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I have this problem in the winter so I planted winter rye in on my lawn,and I also go by strip malls where the grass is being cut and ask the guys if I can have the grass,most will give it away and help you load it in your car/truck.Then I put all this green in my pile and water it down.I also check craigslist for free poop from the farm&garden section,and ad it to the pile.My pile is usually around 120.


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PostPosted: Thu Sep 02, 2010 9:33 pm 
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wow, cool... good to know the temp scale...


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 12, 2010 11:27 am 
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I know this sounds gross, but if you will save up a gallon of urine and add it all at once to a cold (or slightly warm) pile, It will heat up very quickly. Just make sure you have plenty of browns mixed in well...

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