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PostPosted: Mon Apr 12, 2010 9:37 pm 
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As of today April 12, 2010 my lawn is still brown, my first question is when does St Augustine normally comes out of it's dormancy stage? Next there is an area in my yard where i'm fighting off Brown Patch. I heard corn meal is good for fighting this fungus. My question is how much do I apply and should I water it in afterward?

Thanks, Robert


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PostPosted: Wed Apr 14, 2010 10:51 pm 
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Location: Denton, Texas
The time when st. augustine starts to green is "now". If you have "brown patch", then good news for you... It wont be there much longer. :D You are really just a few weeks of proper watering and some good mowings away from a nice lawn. :wink:


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 17, 2010 12:08 am 
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The corn meal app rate is 20 pounds per 1,000 square feet to get rid of ongoing fungal disease. If you want to prevent it, apply at 10 pounds per 1,000. If you really want to prevent it, apply at 10 pounds but do it every month.

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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2010 4:25 am 
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Well, my grass is finally starting to green up... I still have a problem with brown patch, right now it's bermuda growing where the brown patch is. I did spread corn meal on my yard and will continue to do so it hopes of getting rid of the brown patch and bermuda.. By the way I live in the Dallas area..


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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2010 7:14 am 
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dfwgo2guy wrote:
Well, my grass is finally starting to green up... I still have a problem with brown patch, right now it's bermuda growing where the brown patch is. I did spread corn meal on my yard and will continue to do so it hopes of getting rid of the brown patch and bermuda.. By the way I live in the Dallas area..

____________
I had every fungus possible in my SA for the last two years. This year (thanks to our Moderator) I followed the advise you just received and have been spreading CM once a month. No fungus! YEAH! :lol:

Good luck! I know it is frustrating.

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Char Harris,
Flower Mound, TX


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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2010 7:30 am 
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I do have one other question. How do you go about spreading your Corn Meal on your lawn?


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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2010 8:21 am 
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Location: Dallas, TX
I use my $25 Scott's rotary spreader from Home Depot. I don't really worry about the spreader setting, I just try to distribute the contents evenly. I usually go in rows spaced about 5ft and I estimate the spreader setting so that I go through half of what I'm spreading on the first pass. Then I adjust the setting and cover the yard again in an attempt to completely finish spreading the material with a second pass.

I have a 2600 sqft lawn. So a 40lb bag of corn meal gives me about 15lbs per 1000 sqft.

Your shoes will turn orange so I've started spreading it barefoot. Yes, my neighbors think I'm nuts.


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PostPosted: Fri May 14, 2010 1:58 pm 
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Cool, Thanks Guys for he information. It's much appreciated... :)


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PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2010 10:42 am 
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Hello,

My brown patches of St. Augustine in shaded areas have shown very sparse areas of green growth over the past few weeks, but are still predominately brown. There are also some other patches in the lawn in non-shaded areas, so I am going to treat for fungus.

Would applying milk alone do just as well as the corn meal in addressing any fungus issues? I'm holding off on fertilizer at this time, so would milk alone be sufficient?

Also, the brown patches (thatch) are about an inch or less. Should I leave them for the microbes or pull them? If I should pull them, should I pull the area now, if fungus is involved, or wait until later to rule out dormant lawn? There are a very, very few green stolons running under a few areas of the thatch.

Thank you so much for any assistance to any of the questions!

(I mistakenly put this under the wrong topic, and I’m reposting an edited version after seeing the information I requested on another forum -thanks so much!. I apologize – newbee to the forum at work!)


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PostPosted: Sat May 15, 2010 1:39 pm 
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[quote="Onward and Upward"]Hello,

My brown patches of St. Augustine in shaded areas have shown very sparse areas of green growth over the past few weeks, but are still predominately brown. There are also some other patches in the lawn in non-shaded areas, so I am going to treat for fungus.


***********It does sound like a fungus BUT did you check for grubs? Grubs love to eat the roots of SA. The leaves turn brown and then are easy to remove. Just a thought!

Would applying milk alone do just as well as the corn meal in addressing any fungus issues? I'm holding off on fertilizer at this time, so would milk alone be sufficient?

********I have not tried milk yet. I spread CM once a month...since March. This is my first time to start Spring without a fungus. I also cross my fingers alot! :lol:
OH...CM is also a fertilizer. So you would want to spread it evenly on your whole yard. I assume you fertilize organically? Too much nitrogen can also promote the growth of 'patch' fungus. Frequent, shallow watering and night watering is also a 'no-no.' Also, keep your mower on the highest setting AND keep your blades sharp. Do not mow when your grass is wet or damp. Fungus can be spread by your mower and grass cuttings. Bag your clippings until the fungus is gone. Then you can go back to mulching your clippings.

*******



Also, the brown patches (thatch) are about an inch or less. Should I leave them for the microbes or pull them? If I should pull them, should I pull the area now, if fungus is involved, or wait until later to rule out dormant lawn? There are a very, very few green stolons running under a few areas of the thatch.

********If you are sure it is brown patch and you can easily remove the brown grass areas...well that would be my choice. You could then fill in those areas with Texas Greensand and a light layer of compost. SA spreads and can fill in quickly when healthy.


I am a 'newbie.' I am sure you will also get some wonderful suggestions from the Veterns on the Forum.

One last thought or two. How is your soil and drainage? And how much sun do you get in your shaded areas? The biggest mistake I made was treating the fungus BUT not fixing the 'cause' of the fungus.

Good Luck!

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Char Harris,
Flower Mound, TX


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PostPosted: Sun May 16, 2010 6:50 pm 
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Hi Char!

Thanks so much for your reply!

The main area of brown patch was the best area of the entire lawn: beautiful, green, essentially weed-free, and not one brown patch - until after the snow, so I’ll have to rule out grubs and any soil and drainage problems! However, it is very well shaded. Since it was not a problem area, I didn’t really monitor the amount of sun and shade like the other areas. :D If I had to guess, I’d have to guess 50%-75% shade?

I didn’t know too much nitrogen could promote patch fungus - that is an amazing piece of info! I’ve been so focused on weed eradication, that I’ve liberally applied only corn gluten meal (pre-emergent herbicide) as a fertilizer (to help the St. Augustine grow), which is high in nitrogen. I’m holding off on fertilizing and am considering milk as an anti-fungal, because I’m trying to remove the annual bluegrass, which loves excessive nitrogen too. Hmmm…excessive nitrogen…again… So I was wondering about the effectiveness of milk compared to corn meal. I read yesterday about corn meal juice – that could be an option too!

I’m glad you haven’t had fungus this spring! I’ll definitely have to consider cornmeal as a fertilizer in the near future!

Thank you for the greensand and compost tip – I do have to fill any areas that are removed! It is so true, healthy St. Augustine grows like wild!

I was watering in the morning; but read last year that it was OK to water at night or in the day in Texas, so I watered in the nighttime last summer at out convenience. I read yesterday on the Dirt Doctor site to water only in the day. Whoops. I watered infrequently and deeply, the lawn was mowed on the highest setting and not when the grass was wet or damp. But I will make sure the blade is kept sharp and the bag is used until the brown patches are gone – thanks so much!

You’ve given me a lot of tools to use to get to the root of the fungus! You and other “newbies” have been so helpful! (It would be very nice to get suggestions from the veterans, but if it's meant to be, it will be!) I am so thankful for your reply!


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PostPosted: Sun May 16, 2010 7:08 pm 
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I didn’t know too much nitrogen could promote patch fungus - that is an amazing piece of info! I’ve been so focused on weed eradication, that I’ve liberally applied only corn gluten meal (pre-emergent herbicide) as a fertilizer (to help the St. Augustine grow), which is high in nitrogen.
____________
The nitrogen in CMG is not a problem. No worries! It is the synthetic fertilizers that can cause a problem. You are fine!

I have noticed that my SA is spreading more now that our temps are staying in the 80's. Hopefully your SA will 'kick' in soon!

Keep us posted!

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Char Harris,
Flower Mound, TX


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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2010 7:55 am 
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Location: Dallas, TX
Just FYI, after shopping around 3 places I paid $18.99 for a 40lb bag of corn meal.


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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2010 9:23 am 
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Char,

Oh - but too much nitrogen is something to keep in mind!

I saw a little spreading in the St. Augustine too, so we'll see! I'll definitely try the milk to rule out fungus issues!

Thanks so much again!!

I'm off to pull weeds :shock:


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PostPosted: Mon May 17, 2010 9:25 am 
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EAnton,

$18.99 for a bag of organic corn meal is what I found too (in Dallas)!


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