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PostPosted: Wed Aug 25, 2010 1:35 pm 
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In the spring of 09 we put in a Bermuda(common bermuda) yard on property in Central Texas. It looked great last summer. This past spring it never came up. It died over the winter. We think that my dad may have sprayed it with weed killer too heavily(?), but not sure. THe other thought was that it is too compacted and needs to be aereated? Now it is a solid weed patch and the grass burrs are starting to take over. WE do have a lot of wildlife as we put in a disappearing stream and waterfall so they always have water available. I know they bring in weeds and seeds, but they have always been there. The problem is the grass. Before we planted Dad plowed and sprayed a lot and seeded rye in winter. It is a large area, so we are trying to bring it back economically. I have been reading about organics and soil and seed germination and am convinced we have killed the soil and need to go the organic way. I read in another forum here about corn meal gluten and molasses, but am not sure of how to proceed especially this time of year and cost. Also, have dogs, so I really need a speedy fix for the grass burrs if there is one. They are thick on the other side of our creek which has no irrigation. Again, lots of plowing, which I have learned only makes it worse! Thanks!


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 20, 2010 5:25 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Since you never mentioned watering, mowing, or fertilizing, I'm thinking the yard was neglected. Bermuda will not thrive on its own. There are grasses which will almost thrive on their own which you might consider if you are going to leave the area untended. Or...please correct me if I'm wrong about your giving it proper care.

Proper care for bermuda includes at least monthly deep watering (preferably weekly), weekly mowing (preferably 3x per week) at the lowest setting on the mower, and monthly applications of high powered fertilizer. The highest power organic fertilizer is soy bean meal applied at a rate of at least 40 pounds per 1,000 square feet. If you can't keep up with that schedule, then expect to have some weeds.

If you are interested in a very low maintenance lawn, consider trying blue grama grass. It is normally used as a pasture grass for livestock but when it is mowed, it is gorgeous. Blue grama usually thrives on annual rainfall and zero fertilizer. The only thing is to keep it mowed down to a turf height of around 3 inches. Oh and it requires FULL sun. Any shade and it will not grow.

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