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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2011 8:31 am 
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Joined: Mon Jul 26, 2010 9:13 pm
Posts: 11
Just noticed that my St. Augustine is starting to develop a bit of a yellow hue. Before that it was really greening-up coming out of winter. I have fertilized once this year, and applied Thrive just before I started to see this.

Any ideas what would be going on this time of year?


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PostPosted: Mon May 23, 2011 8:21 am 
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Joined: Sun Apr 11, 2010 6:39 pm
Posts: 71
Location: Dallas, TX
Several things could cause the yellowing.

Quote:
St. Augustine Decline (SAD) is a virus causing a chlorotic mottling or stippling of St. Augustinegrass leaves. St. Augustinegrass and centipedegrass are the only turfgrasses that the virus is known to affect. The virus is widespread in Texas and has been reported in Louisiana and Arkansas.

Description. In the early stages of infection, St. Augustinegrass leaves show a chlorotic mottling or stippling. As the mottling progresses, leaves develop a chlorotic appearance.


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The first symptoms of take-all root rot usually
appear in the spring and summer as yellowing
(chlorosis) of the leaves, which gives the affected
areas of the lawn a yellow-green cast


Quote:
The chinch bug damages St. Augustine grass by feeding on the stems at the base of the leaf sheath. Populations of chinch bugs may reach several hundred per square foot with damage usually apparent at 20 to 30 chinch bugs per square foot. Initial injury symptoms from chinch bugs resembles drought stress -- stunted, chlorotic spots in open (full sun) areas of the lawn. As feeding continues, irregular areas of dead grass develop in the lawn.


Quote:
St. Augustine grass grows satisfactorily at a pH range from 5.0 to 8.5, but develops a chlorotic appearance in highly alkaline soils (above pH 7.5)


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PostPosted: Sat Jun 04, 2011 2:41 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
If you have gotten a lot of rain then it is the result of the rain. It washes the acidity out of the root zone and the high pH soil binds up all the iron. You can make that iron available with an app of greensand at 40 pounds per 1,000 square feet.

You might also try fertilizing on a monthly basis to see if that improves it. You don't say what kind of grass you have. I'm assuming it is St Augustine.

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Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


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