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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2003 9:24 am 
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Joined: Wed Apr 02, 2003 12:29 pm
Posts: 19
Location: Monticello
I currently relocated to Arkansas and the property I'm on has sandy soil. I have some bare spots in my St Augustine grass under some Pine trees and I was wondering what kind of soil amendments(for sandy soil) I can use to prepare these bare spots to start growing grass again. Should I put sod or seed down once I have prepared the soil?


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PostPosted: Mon Sep 08, 2003 9:57 am 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
I would do the entire yard with 1/3 inch of excellent, finished compost (that's one cubic yard of compost per 1,000 square feet). Then go back to the bare spots and put a little more down. Then use sod. There is no St Augustine seed worth mentioning.

Many people think manure = compost. Not so. Manure is an ingredient in compost, but it has to decompse for months before it becomes excellent, finished compost. Finished compost smells fabulous through and through! That's the best clue as to what you have.

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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:47 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 7:31 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Fredericksburg, Tx
:shock: Please tell me that the manure bought in bags at Lowes or
Walmart, Home Depot, etc. has already been "cured" if I can use that
term accurately here???? It still smells pretty strong and I didn't plant anything
for two weeks after spreading it last spring. So do you suppose that
stuff has already set and is ready to go. I never even looked to see
if there were instructions on the bag. Since I am so new to all this
I thought as I was turning it into the soil about how everyone is always
saying don't eat the lettuce and things in Mexico due to the bacteria
and again I wasn't sure but thought it might be from the animal dung.
Thanks for helping me on this matter.
amkind2life


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PostPosted: Tue Sep 09, 2003 5:55 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 7:31 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Fredericksburg, Tx
:shock: Please tell me that the manure bought in bags at Lowes or
Walmart, Home Depot, etc. has already been "cured" if I can use that
term accurately here???? It still smells pretty strong and I didn't plant anything
for two weeks after spreading it last spring. So do you suppose that
stuff has already set and is ready to go.
I never even looked to see if there were instructions on the bag. No one
who ate the veggies came down ill yet anyway. I can hope
it is an O.K. source if I want to use animal manure, which I don't
believe I do anymore after using cornmeal and alfalfa.
I'll just be happy when I finally don't feel like such a dunce. :oops:
I thought as I was turning it into the soil about how everyone is always
saying don't eat the lettuce and things in Mexico due to the bacteria
and again I wasn't sure but thought it might be from the animal dung.
Thanks for helping me on this matter.
amkind2life


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PostPosted: Wed Sep 10, 2003 6:51 pm 
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Joined: Wed Aug 06, 2003 7:49 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Ft Worth-I30&Hulen
If it still smells like it came out of the cow it is not ready yet. I have bought from home depot and lowes. What they have does not smell as good as freshly composted products in open air. Im not sure but it may have something with the packaging and storing.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2003 3:34 pm 
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Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Finished compost smells fabulous through and through! That's the best clue as to what you have.

Finished compost smells fabulous through and through! That's the best clue as to what you have.

Finished compost smells fabulous through and through! That's the best clue as to what you have.

I'm necessarily saying manure is a bad thing because it has been used for centuries with descent results. If you want to have more fun and spare yourself the embarassment of the neighbors pointing and laughing while they hold their noses, then use finished compost. I believe that the embarassment of manure is one of the three big reasons why more people do not use organic materials.

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 11, 2003 4:18 pm 
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Joined: Mon Jul 07, 2003 7:31 pm
Posts: 25
Location: Fredericksburg, Tx
Thanks David :D
nice to know there's no threat to disease from spreading
the store bought kind of animal manure. Trust me on this
one. In this town, though the house across the street
might make it into some fancy magazine for it's gardens
and historical value, the chickens in the neighbors yard
still crow at the crack of dawn. If you don't drive carefully
in and around the neighborhoods, one might hit a frightened
deer. Nah, no one here is gonna complain about the smell
of animal manure. Did you read my postyesterday about the
Renewable Energy Roundup & Green Living Fair? www.TheROUNDUP.org
amkind


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