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PostPosted: Sun Mar 30, 2003 3:14 pm 
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Can I overseed an existing lawn (1 & 1/2 acres of bermuda, clover, and assorted weeds) with buffalo grass? If so, how? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Rick


Last edited by YardDog on Sat Apr 05, 2003 11:24 am, edited 1 time in total.

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PostPosted: Mon Mar 31, 2003 2:15 pm 
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What would be the point of seeding buffalo grass? You could do that and you would have a mix of buffalo, bermuda, and clover along with assorted weeds.

Buffalo will not compete against any weeds.


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PostPosted: Sat Apr 05, 2003 11:32 am 
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The point to wanting buffalo grass is that does not require a lot of water & it is a slow growth grass. It's the perfect grass for large areas where you want a nice looking lawn without the high upkeep associated with traditional grasses. The drawback is that it is slow to establish itself. That's why I want to know if it possible to overseed or if I will need to till the area under & start from scratch.


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 Post subject: Buffalo
PostPosted: Sun Apr 06, 2003 9:22 am 
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Location: Mc Kinney, Texas
I am curious about that as this grass was supposed to choke out other grasses and weeds. At least that was the major selling point!


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PostPosted: Thu Apr 10, 2003 12:32 pm 
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I've never seen a buffalo grass lawn that looked like it was a lawn. Even the sodded lawns look like an abandoned lot in about a month. They don't choke out any weeds. In fact, the grass seems to open up to invite weeds in.

Buff is a thin and scraggly pasture grass in every application. Maybe it's the San Antonio soil, climate, or something else, but I can't believe buff is on the market as a sod or seed. If someone has a nice stand of it somewhere, I'll bet you a dollar to a donut that they spend a ton of time and money on it.

Now ask me my real opinion :shock: I'll chill now. It's only a grass after all.


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PostPosted: Tue Apr 29, 2003 12:19 pm 
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Bermuda and St. Augustine are more agressive and will take over. Use Buffalo if you want a casual look that requires little mowing and minimal watering and fertilizing. Don't use Buffalo if you want your yard to look the the 14th tee at Pebble Beach. Also, it does not take traffic well and you will have to pull a few weeds.


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PostPosted: Thu May 01, 2003 1:31 pm 
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Location: Waxahachie,TX
YardDog wrote:
Can I overseed an existing lawn (1 & 1/2 acres of bermuda, clover, and assorted weeds) with buffalo grass? If so, how? Any help would be greatly appreciated!

Rick


I too fall into this category and have thought the same as far as seeding. I do not know about YardDog but if Buffalo Grass is not a good way to go what is? I need something that can take a lot of sun and heat but won't be equal in cost to buying a car. St. Augustine is out only comes in sod and that is WAY too expensive for an acre of property. Anyone have any ideas?


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 Post subject: Grass.
PostPosted: Mon May 05, 2003 7:43 am 
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Location: Waxahachie,TX
Thanks, I will look into it. Any other recommendations? :?:


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 Post subject: Buffola
PostPosted: Sun May 11, 2003 9:53 am 
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Hooray for you. Using a grass indigenous to the area is the only way to conserve our water. We in N. Texas use entirely too much water on this crop we call lawns. Go to the web site for Native American Seeds also call them they are extremely helpfull. Your quest is a good one - Down with thirty lawns!!!!


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 Post subject: Buffalo grass
PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2003 9:05 am 
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Location: Glen Rose, TX
I live in Glen Rose, on top of a rock. I sodded with 609 Buffalo 2 yrs ago. It is taking some time, and yes, I do fight weeds. But I do get compliments on my lawn! Trying to turn a rock into an organic based growing machine will take some more time...but it's been fun and rewarding. I'd recommend buffalo to anyone starting a new lawn. :)


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 Post subject: Buffalo
PostPosted: Tue May 13, 2003 7:07 pm 
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Oops!!! I meant "down with thirsty lawns!"


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PostPosted: Wed May 14, 2003 11:43 am 
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I liked "down with thirty lawns!" :lol: I think we knew what you meant.

I have an anecdote that dispells the myth that St Augustine is a thirty lawn (sorry I couldn't resist). My next door neighbor has not watered her lawn in 4 years since she moved in. It is arguably the best looking St Augustine lawn on the block, street, and (upscale) neighborhood. The only water it has had is rainwater. It remains fantastic looking through every drought and water rationing period we've had because of what? -she never waters anyway!

For the first 2 years she never mowed either. The grass got to about 12 inches long before it really slowed down its growth. But it looked great 12 months a year if you can tolerate the length. It was dark green for 24 months in a row. Then a kindly neighbor mowed her lawn back to the ground. It nearly died but, since she continued to do nothing to it, it eventually responded. Last year she bought a mower and cut it twice. The last time was in September. When it stopped growing it was about 4 inches tall. It remained dark green with zero brown blades all winter. I looked every single day waiting for it to turn brown like the rest of our yards. Spring came and it looks the same as ever.

I swear this lawn has never been watered except for rain in 4 years! She and I laugh about it once a week. This year she bought a mister - one of those things that sits on a curly pole about 3 feet above the surface. She has that thing running all the time now and sometimes sits it on the grass. You can see the spray floating away in the breeze. I get as much benefit from it as she does. Anyone in San Antonio is welcome to come by and see for themselves. Email me for the address.


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2003 4:01 pm 
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Location: Dallas, Texas
Dchall_San_Antonio wrote:
I liked "down with thirty lawns!" :lol: I think we knew what you meant.

I have an anecdote that dispells the myth that St Augustine is a thirty lawn (sorry I couldn't resist). My next door neighbor has not watered her lawn in 4 years since she moved in. It is arguably the best looking St Augustine lawn on the block, street, and (upscale) neighborhood. The only water it has had is rainwater. It remains fantastic looking through every drought and water rationing period we've had because of what? -she never waters anyway!


During two drought years here in Dallas -- 1997/98 -- my St. Augustine lawn died in the most exposed areas. Grass in partial shaded areas survived. I bought my house during the winter of '97 and was totally unprepared for the following rainless summer (I grew up in Florida where it rains consistently all summer long). I had hoped the surviving areas would spread and retake the dead spots but weeds moved in instead -- especially bent grass. I'm finally thinking of resodding parts of my front yard with St. Augustine this fall. My backyard is mostly a wildlife garden now so I'm not worried about resodding that part of my property. The thought of planting grass drives me a little nuts but I may sell this house soon and I feel compelled to succomb to the 'curb appeal' syndrome.

Like your neighbor, I don't water my grass. In the years since '97/'98 my St. Augustine has done just fine. But those two drought years...

Howard Williams
Dallas, Texas


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PostPosted: Sun Jul 13, 2003 8:59 pm 
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Location: Dallas,TEXAS
For my st. augustine lawn I'm watering every seven days and in recent weeks areas that receive heavy sun throughout the day are starting to show signs of needing water well before that seventh day arrives. I'm watering deeply and mowing as high as I can set the mower once every week. In most areas this means that there really isn't any mowing occuring as a result. This past June marked the first full year of this property's organic program. While I'm very pleased with the way my lawn looks, it would seem that I have a looong way to go before I'm seeing my st. augustine, or the soil it's in, reach the level your neighbor's has.. :(

~Dave Cluck


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