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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 10:10 am 
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Joined: Thu Jan 29, 2004 9:46 pm
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Location: florida
you say that corn meal should be used as fertilizer on st augustine?

where and who is used it as a fertilizer?

why wouldnt you use a milorganite or cow manure product?

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PostPosted: Wed Sep 29, 2004 11:20 am 
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Joined: Fri May 28, 2004 9:11 pm
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Location: Keller (North FW),Texas
First off, not trying to step on David's toes here, just wanting to lend a hand.

Scott Fl,

You can use both, not a problem at all. The main reason to use corn meal is to fight the non-resistance of or susceptibility to fungal problems that St. Augustine has. How does it work? The cornmeal feeds another type of fungus that preys on the fungus that is attacking your plants. Increasing the colonies of the beneficial microbes to the point that they are the predominant microbial life and not leaving much room for the others. Aerobic compost teas also helps these colonies grow, giving the plant a natural defense against disease.

Keep up your Milorganite or other organic fertilizer too. I generally mix cornmeal into my fertilizer when applying it. Makes one less trip for me with the spreader...

If you are going to use manure, make sure it is well composted before applying.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2004 8:07 am 
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Go back and reread the FAQ at the top of this forum. The answers are there in a summary form. If you want the deeper answer, go to the USDA's Soil Biology Primer. In a very well written 50 page illustrated website they give you a comprehensive explanation of how microbes in the soil convert sugars and proteins into materials that help the plants grow and survive pests and disease. Milorganite and manures provide very little sugars and proteins. The ground grains provide both sugars and proteins.

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