It is currently Thu Jul 28, 2016 4:49 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Tue Mar 22, 2005 8:51 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
After reading David Hall's suggestion about over-seeding a lawn with White Dutch Clover I decided to try it. Just ordered 2lbs from Outsidepride.com. I found it interesting that back in the 50s this clover seed was actually included in grass seed for the purpose of adding nitrogen to the soil and creating a monoculture in your lawn.

Since those days I guess we have been programed by the herbicide folks that anything other than grass in your lawn is a disgrace to you and your family.

Has anyone tried Dutch White clover in their lawn, and are you happy with the results? I was also thinking of using it to try and choke out some poison ivy (my obsession).


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Wed May 18, 2005 11:23 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
How's your clover doing?

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 9:38 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
How's my clover? It appears to be a waste of money. I see a few patches here and there, but I'm not sure if those are the Dutch whites or native clover.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 10:17 am 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Thanks for writing. Sorry about the results. I wonder what happened?

Would you mind going over how you planted the clover seed? What was the original turfgrass? -when did you plant? -did you do anything to prepare the soil/turf? -how did you scatter the seed? -did you topdress before or after seeding? -did you roll after seeding? -did you water or rely on Nature? -did you use any organic or chemical materials at about that time?

And what was the coverage (pounds of seed per 1,000 square feet) recommended on the seed bag/box?

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Nov 11, 2005 3:27 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
As I recall, it was late Spring when I planted. I mixed the seed with some sand to help with dispersal. No soil prep. I simply broadcast the seed/sand mixture by hand in several different locations. Some areas were full-sun, some part and some shade. Some areas were watered, some not. Some areas were among native grasses, some among St. Augustine, some bare ground. Perhaps they germinated but are dormant with the drought were in. The lack of prep and watering was because I figured, like a weed, they would thrive on the neglect. I do have very rocky (white) soil, so maybe they prefer a deeper soil.

I can't remember the pounds ratio. It seems like the coverage was 2lbs per 1,000 sq. ft. of seed but I'm not positive.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 7:02 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Dec 31, 1969 6:00 pm
Posts: 219
Location: Hubbard,TEXAS
Just a thought--was this a summer clover? We put out clover in the Fall.

Pat Akin


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: clover
PostPosted: Sat Nov 12, 2005 7:25 am 
Offline

Joined: Sat Mar 06, 2004 7:33 am
Posts: 764
Location: Plano & land at Dodd City,TEXAS
HEY-
kbrew is back! Glad to 'see' you-
Patty

_________________
Plano Patty & Jim


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:57 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
pakin wrote:
Just a thought--was this a summer clover? We put out clover in the Fall.

Pat Akin

I'm not familiar with "summer clover" but here is some info I looked up. The info is from a northern perspective, but it is supposedly grown anywhere:

Low growing and green through the summer droughty period, it provided nitrogen for the grasses in the lawn. Widespread use of fertilizers and herbicides beginning in the l950’s changed that. This once popular lawn component is now widely regarded as a weed or as a forage crop.

But white clover is making a comeback. Pesticide free zones in Canada are again using white clover for their lawns. Many new houses in “exurbia,” beyond the suburbs, are putting in five-acre lawns and seeking minimal maintenance on them. Wells are common; concerns about potential leaching are sometimes heard, but many don’t want to spend the resources for a high maintenance lawn or the time to fertilize/pesticide or mow it.

There are many kinds of clover but most are used for forage crops and are substantially taller than White Dutch. Among these forage types are: ‘Ladino,’ ‘New Zealand’ and ‘Alsike.’

White Dutch clover (also known as Shamrock or Irish clover):

· grows about four to eight inches high

· tolerates low mowing well

· spreads to fill in empty spaces

· stays green through droughty periods of summer

· tolerates dog urine

· provides nitrogen (up to 2 pounds of n/1000 square feet) for the other grasses in the lawn, eliminating the need to fertilize

· looks good especially if it is blended evenly throughout the lawn.

White Dutch clover is hard to find in area seed stores that specialize in conventional grasses. Many carry clover but don’t know what kind. You may wind up with a higher growing clover than you want. White Dutch is readily available on the Internet. Search for white clover on almost any search engine and you’ll get shopping choices. www.outsidepride.com sells White Dutch clover in a 10-pound quantity for about $25 (larger quantities available) and ships within 2 business days of the order. www.seedland.com sells 50-pound bags. So look around for a source. But remember: WHITE DUTCH, THE LOW GROWING KIND.

White Dutch clover needs a bacterium inoculant for best growth. Some vendors sell seeds with it already in place. Some sell it separately. Ask before you buy.

If you are putting in a new lawn, add clover at a rate of two to four pounds/acre (0.7 to 1.4 ounces per 1,000 square feet) to your seed mix and stir it up well. A little goes a long way.

Overseeding can be done as “frost seeding” in early March when the soil is still honeycombed with frost. Do this early in the day while the soil contains frost. Delaying until mid-morning when the soil surface has become slippery will not be as effective. White Dutch can also be over seeded with conventional seedbed preparation techniques in either the early spring or August 15 to early September. Use twice the amount of seed as for a new lawn.

White Dutch clover is easily killed with conventional broadleaf herbicides. So if you want clover, you don’t want to use broadleaf weed control products.

White Dutch clover attracts honeybees. If allergic reactions to bee stings are a concern, white clover is not for you. Also, clover stains in clothes are more difficult to launder out than grass stains.

Written by Ed Leonard, Cornell Cooperative Extension of Rensselaer County Intern, 7/2002.

_________________
Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: Re: clover
PostPosted: Mon Nov 14, 2005 9:58 am 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Tricky Grama wrote:
HEY-
kbrew is back! Glad to 'see' you-
Patty

Thanks, glad to be back. I guess they have changed the membership policy because I'm not a subscriber.

_________________
Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: test
PostPosted: Tue Nov 15, 2005 12:55 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Fri Oct 08, 2004 7:15 pm
Posts: 12
Location: Mansfield,TEXAS
this is a test frm KK


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 10 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife