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PostPosted: Thu May 19, 2005 1:11 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
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Location: Garland, Texas
I turned over 6 garden forks worth of soil in the worst patch...Not even a single grub. I was surprised to not find any. :? So the mystery continues...

It did seem odd that we had June bugs so early, but they have disappeared just as quickly around my house. But the occurrence was enough to plant the seed of doubt. :)

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PostPosted: Fri May 20, 2005 10:26 am 
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Joined: Fri May 28, 2004 9:11 pm
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Location: Keller (North FW),Texas
Maybe now it is time to plant seeds of grass.... :lol: :mrgreen:

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PostPosted: Sat May 21, 2005 3:05 pm 
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Joined: Thu Mar 27, 2003 10:51 pm
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Location: Garland, Texas
As I mentioned earlier, the surrounding St. Agustine is slowly sending runners into the "bare" area. I'm going to leave the dead grass in place and let nature take her course and "re-plant" the area for me. Hopefully by season's end the dead spots will be covered.

Still pulling weeds and the areas of thin turf don't show much improvement. I'm still considering adding the dry humate later this Fall. I'm still waiting for the point where organics lawn/garden care becomes "cheaper" and less maintenance intensive. One would think that I should be there already. :?

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PostPosted: Thu Sep 22, 2005 9:29 pm 
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Joined: Mon Mar 10, 2003 9:10 am
Posts: 1278
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
Mr. Clean wrote:
Scott-in-Texas wrote:
...So, just stick it out, it will all get better, and, as we all should know by now with organics, it all takes time, like weeks and months, not days.
Quote:

You see Scott, therein lies the problem. This is a property with a decade + long period of organic care. Hundreds of $ worth of organic ammendments. Add in mechanical (core) aeration and countless hours of hand weeding. IF an organic program were the magic as it so often proclaimed then my property should be on some magazine cover.

What we (people on this forum) all believe (and preach to others) is that if you develop healthy soil, you will grow a healthy turf. This healthy turf is supposedly more disease resistant and it's dense nature should edge out any invading weeds. I for one have always tempered this sermon with the disclaimer that you should expect a certain amount of weeds with an organic program. I think that I will shout this disclaimer with a bit more fervor for those considering the switch.


It is my understanding, that if one has very poor soil (dirt, if you will) if you desire the land to become lush and the soil easily workable in a short amount of time, you may have to invest a good bit of money in order for this to happen: aeration, humate, lava sand, greensand, compost, etc.

If you are like me, on an extremely limited income: (my husband's income: part of which pays for a great deal of child support), you have to be patient and do what you can as your budget allows.

I am amazed at how my yard has transformed from the time I uncovered several dozen square feet of carpet and roofing shingles under Bermuda-ridden compacted soil less than 3 years ago into what it is now. Mind you, it is not perfect, but with buying in bulk from Soil Building Systems, and adding molasses, cornmeal, organic fertilizers, lava sand, greensand, and humate, the soil is much more pliable and the plants flourish such that I am forced to trim many of my plants and herbs back often so that they do not take over. Some areas are fine without having to fertilize at all. In the long run, organic wins hands down!

I know several people who no longer fertilize at all. Their yards are wonderful. One of the yards is so beautiful, the owner rents out her property for wedding ceremonies. Incredible are the results from using organic methods (and less expensive is sure a big plus) in the long run.

Just as investing in the stock market, it is best to consider the long-term effects. Wouldn't you agree?

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