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PostPosted: Fri Apr 28, 2006 7:11 pm 
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Location: Waxahachie,TEXAS
I have several patches of fescue in my common bermuda lawn, I tried using a weedhound to pull them out but its too much work. Someone recommended a product called "Image" but I dont really wanna have to use chemicals unless I have too. Will the fescue go away this summer or what? Help me get rid of it, it grows quicker than my bermuda and looks awful!!!

Jason

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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2006 12:14 pm 
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Are you sure that isn't winter rye? Winter rye will die out soon, so you could try letting it go. But if it is fescue read on...

We talk here about deep infrequent watering to develop deep roots to withstand the summer heat. You might do just the opposite. You might try shallow frequent watering. You might try watering 10 minutes a day for a week and then no water for 2 weeks. The bermuda IS going to live. Whether this will kill the fescue, I don't really know. I do know that shallow rooted fescue will not live through a hot summer unless it is really babied. By watering frequently for a short time, and then denying water, you are stressing those plants, including the bermuda. But again, the bermuda WILL live.

Another thing that fescue doesn't like is a lot of nitrogen in the summer heat. You might try some soy or corn gluten meal at 20-30 pounds per 1,000 square feet on the 4th of July. You'll have to water that just enough to wet it down, but you're not trying to dissolve it or anything.

And the website where you keep your pictures tried to install spyware cookies from four different sites on my computer :shock: :shock: :shock: . You might want to reconsider where you store your stuff. 8)

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PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2006 12:35 pm 
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Okay, I just went to the other site where you posted close up pictures of your lawn. That is not bermuda. It is St Augustine. In this case I'd like to retract my previous message because it doesn't apply to you.

That is probably winter rye in the lawn, but the fact that the lawn looks sort of like bermuda from a distance means you are probably not following the basic rules. Here they are...

...well how about that! I have a new computer and haven't moved the basic rules over to this one. Anyway, here's a summary..

1. Water deeply and infrequently. I'm talking about watering only once a week in the heat of summer and once a month the rest of the year. If the St Aug looks bad before you need to water again, water right away and water for much longer this time. Watering deeply means (for me) to water for 2 hours in each zone with a 50% overlap between zones. If Mother Nature waters for you, you can skip it.

2. Mulch mow at your mower's HIGHEST setting. Let the St Aug get as tall as you can stand it to do three things (a) collect as much sunlight as possible (this sends much needed sugars to the roots and soil), (b) shade the soil to keep the sunlight away from weed seeds (seeds need sunlight and lots of water to sprout - I don't care how many million weed seeds you have on the surface of the soil, if they don't have sun and water, they won't sprout), (c) shade the soil to keep it cool (this slows down evaporation). This high setting in full sun with plenty of water will absolute prevent those winter rye seeds from sprouting. Tall St Augustine will choke out almost all the grassy weeds and most all the broadleaf weeds.

3. Fertilize with organic fertilizer regularly. I fertilize with ORDINARY corn meal at a rate of 20 pounds per 1,000 square feet on The Federal Holiday Schedule. That means President's Day, Memorial Day, 4th of July, Labor Day, and Thanksgiving.

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 Post subject: not st angustine
PostPosted: Mon May 08, 2006 4:32 pm 
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Well sorry to burst your bubble but I have no st angustine??? Its bermuda and has been identified as either tiff 419 or a U-3 common type. Its been in full sun for over a year and has done pretty good and it not thick blades like st angustine. ( I know st angustine) Guess the closeup pics made it look like St Angustine, but its for sure bermuda.

Jason


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PostPosted: Sun Jun 04, 2006 8:29 pm 
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Dang! And my bubble was going to good, too!

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