It is currently Wed Jul 27, 2016 9:29 am

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 
Author Message
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:27 am 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
:!:

For anyone that is considering using Palmetto St Augustine, be advised my entire planting installed in the spring of 2005 is totally infected with the St Augustine Decline Virus (Panicum Mosaic Virus) and showing full-blown symptoms of the infection.

The PMV-SAD virus in St Augustine is untreatable and will eventually result in the death of the entire stand of Palmetto.

Since most of the folks on this forum are from Texas, I thought everyone should be informed of this finding. The entire State of Texas is one of the worst locations for PMV-SAD infection in St Augustine.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:09 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
I cut my own St Augustine and do not have a lawn service company, so I’m not exactly sure how it got in the Palmetto. The only way that I can see it became infected is because the entire neighborhood has been infected with SAD for many years. The Palmetto was planted in a known SAD-infected environment and quickly developed the symptoms.

I’m surprised you haven’t seen SAD-infected St Augustine in your area. It is unusual to find a St Augustine yard that isn’t infected to some degree here unless it’s Raleigh SA – which appears to have 100% immunity. Most of the Texas Common St Augustine that has survived the decades-long infection here seems to have developed some resistance to the virus by showing very mild symptoms. The SAD virus is definitely present, but it doesn’t seem to do any real long-term harm. There are some St Augustine yards that have been infected more than 20 years and are still doing fine and look good. I suppose the virus wiped out the St Augustine that couldn’t adapt to the infection years ago – just my unscientific opinion.

Samples of the grass were sent to Texas A&M, and yes – it is a PMV-SAD infection. If I can figure out how to post some photos on this forum, I’ll post some shots of the Palmetto for you to see.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:31 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
I'll post some photos (close-up scans) of the infected Palmetto within 30 minutes or so...


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 15, 2006 1:48 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Sep 13, 2006 2:08 pm
Posts: 14
Location: San Angelo,TEXAS
Here are two photos of the SAD-infected Palmetto. See what you think:

http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l57/C ... lmetto.jpg

http://i93.photobucket.com/albums/l57/C ... lmetto.jpg

The second photo didn't show too well, but the leaves in the lower-left are showing full-blown SAD infection.

Hopefully, this link will zoom in better on the second photo:

Image


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 12:00 pm 
Offline
Moderator
Moderator

Joined: Tue Mar 18, 2003 3:45 pm
Posts: 2884
Location: San Antonio,TEXAS
Texican: I would treat the lawn properly and use only organic materials on it for a full year. Then look closely at it again and see if it has improved.

What is properly?
1. Water deeply and infrequently. Deeply means at least an hour in every zone, all at once. Infrequently means monthly during the cool months and no more than weekly during the hottest part of summer. If your grass looks dry before the month/week is up, water longer next time. Deep watering grows deep, drought resistant roots. Infrequent watering allows the top layer of soil to dry completely which kills off many shallow rooted weeds.

2. Mow at the highest setting on your mower. Most grasses are the most dense when mowed tall. Bermuda, centipede, and bent grasses are the most dense when mowed at the lowest setting on your mower. Dense grass shades out weeds and uses less water when tall. Dense grass feeds the deep roots you're developing in 1 above.

3. Fertilize regularly. I fertilize 4 times per year using organic fertilizer. Which fertilizer you use is much less important than numbers 1 and 2 above.

_________________
David Hall
Moderator
Dirt Doctor Lawns Forum


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Fri Sep 29, 2006 7:01 pm 
Offline
User avatar

Joined: Sun Mar 14, 2004 10:34 pm
Posts: 48
Location: Dallas,TEXAS
I can testify that watering is more important than thinking fertilizing alone will save the day. I had a few sprinkler heads that weren't coming all the way up and I didn't notice them until later. I wondered why the grass around the head was a deep, rich green color and the rest of the yard looked scrappy during the 100deg summer.
Water was the reason - something I underestimated.
Water plays more of a role than just being a 'drink'.
I am going to take watering more seriously in the future.
Good advice on the watering routine above.


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 9 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife