It is currently Sun Aug 28, 2016 4:30 pm

All times are UTC - 6 hours




Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 
Author Message
 Post subject: salt cedar
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 7:34 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2005 6:55 pm
Posts: 286
Location: Saginaw,TX
What is salt cedar? I heard that they are very bad plants. Is it a tree?
Tree Dude


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sat Feb 05, 2005 11:43 pm 
Offline

Joined: Mon Mar 17, 2003 9:06 am
Posts: 358
Location: Midlothian,TEXAS
Tree Dude,
The only thing I know about them is what I learned on trips to Big Bend, TX. Out there, they grow along the Rio Grande and other rivers and streams in the area. They are sucking the river dry and killing off native trees. Below is a related story:

PRESIDIO, Texas — Texas Parks and Wildlife Department is teaming up with the Rio Grande Institute, the National Park Service, and Comisión Nacional de Áreas Naturales Protegidas in Mexico to help control a nemesis of the Rio Grande.

Salt cedar, a species of tamarisk tree, was first brought into the U.S. in 1837 to protect streambanks from erosion. The mature trees, which can grow up to 30 feet tall, infest more than one million acres along rivers and streams throughout the American West and parts of Mexico. The Rio Grande and its tributaries have been hard hit; native cottonwood trees and desert willow are being choked out, and stream flow has been diminished.

The Rio Grande has become lined with salt cedar in Big Bend Ranch State Park, Big Bend National Park, and on the adjacent riverbanks in Mexico. Therefore, two pilot control and native habitat restoration studies are planned at two locations in the Big Bend Area to remove salt cedar and to re-vegetate the areas with native plants such as cottonwoods, willows and mesquites. The site located in Big Bend Ranch State Park will be at Colorado Canyon River Access Area, and in Boquillas Canyon in Big Bend National Park. The outcome will be two-fold: first, demonstration sites for the general public to learn how they can help restore areas they live in with native vegetation, and second, more pleasant and ecologically sound places to visit. The two pilot projects are being funded and supported through a number of organizations, including the World Wildlife Fund, the Meadows Foundation, the Trull Foundation, and the Friends of Big Bend National Park.

The project will also be an educational and community service project for Presidio High School environmental science students who will help with removing salt cedar and planting replacement native vegetation. Additionally, the Presidio students may be able to conduct pre- and post-monitoring of the site in Big Bend Ranch State Park to study the effects of salt cedar removal on bird populations and neighboring vegetation.

Anyone who would like more information on the collaborative project may contact Big Bend Ranch State Park at (432) 229-3416 or (432) 424-3327.

_________________
Listen to Neil Sperry every week, take notes... and then do the exact opposite.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject:
PostPosted: Sun Feb 06, 2005 9:01 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sat Jan 08, 2005 6:55 pm
Posts: 286
Location: Saginaw,TX
Thank you. I guess it is a "true" bad weed.


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: salt cedar
PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2005 1:55 pm 
Offline

Joined: Sun Nov 28, 2004 9:38 am
Posts: 53
Location: joshua
i am seeing more & more salt cedars in the metroplex area growing in undeveloped areas. they are often multitrunked, upright growth habit, grayish, feathery foliage. they bloom (white) in summer if i remember right. they are a devastating, invasive plant. they offer no food to wildlife, poor nesting environment. they suck amazing amount of water which causes the water table to drop in areas. this results in the demise of native plants
bj


Top
 Profile  
 
 Post subject: salt cedar
PostPosted: Sun Mar 27, 2005 9:58 pm 
Offline

Joined: Wed Jul 09, 2003 1:59 pm
Posts: 7
I just saw the postings about salt cedar and just want to confirm what k brew posted and add that the Pecos River is one of the victims of salt cedars. I did a research paper on the Pecos and it's volume has been depleted by the salt cedars. Historical accounts state that it used to be difficult to cross, but now it is a stream almost everywhere in Texas. We took a road trip to observe the Pecos and when one observes the number of those trees all along the banks, it is overwhelming. It is so ironic that they were actually planted for a good purpose and have ruined the rivers. Does that tell us anything about leaving the "natural" habitat as it is?

klwh
west Fort Worth

_________________
klwh


Top
 Profile  
 
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Post new topic Reply to topic  [ 5 posts ] 

All times are UTC - 6 hours


Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
Powered by eWeblife