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 Post subject: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 1:59 pm 
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Hello all, I'm new to organic gardening (well new on so so many levels actually). I've been reading Howard's books and website info and did as much research as possible. I know that this is a process and can't imagine that I'd be perfect out of the shoot. However, I planted my new Double Knockouts last night and today my wife reports they are wilted something fierce. Any advice on what to get them perked up? Will they perk up?

My steps were as follows:

1. Tilled 1/2 bag compost into existing soil down to depth of about 6-8".
2. Added Lava Sand, Dried Molasses, Gardenville Organic Fertilizer, Earthworm Castings, Corn Meal and mixed in 6 more inches of compost.
3. Spread out the mound into a bowl, wet the bowl till moist.
4. Removed all soil from the existing roots of the roses (gently bathing it away in my wheel barrow)
5. Bathed in Garret Juice & Thrive (let it sit for 5 minutes or so)
6. Planted in the raised mound the covered the mound in .5 - 1 inch of earthworm castings and compost.
7. Watered the mound and then mulched with native texas shredded hardwood.
8. I ran the sprinklers in the eve on the entire new bed (with other perennials) and adjusted the sprinkler so that it didn't hit the roses straight on. The water ran for 20 minutes.

Thanks for any feedback you can provider, if I need to supply any other info please ask.

Nathan


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 3:35 pm 
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Location: Arlington, Texas
Where are you located? If you're in Texas, and you've planted your roses in full sun (which I imagine you have), it's HOT today. My knockouts are drooping, too, and they are established. You might try giving your rose a little bit of very light shade in the hottest part of the day for the next several days since it's going to be so hot for April.

I also wonder if you may have given them too much water. What kind of soil do you have? Is it sandy where the water drains off pretty quickly? Or do you have a heavier soil?

Also, what else is planted in this bed? You mentioned other perennials...

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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 6:53 pm 
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Cara thanks for the reply! I'm in Frisco, TX. This part of the bed gets shade part sun/shade in the hottest part of the day. Should I put a thermometer out in that spot? I wonder if the house is radiating heat?

The soil has a good amount of sand mixed in, this seemed builders grade to me, a very orangeish looking sand. There was a good amount of clay, so guessing alkaline soil, the rest of the yard is gumbo when it rains (I know this because of 2 DIY plumbing jobs in the rain). Is it too late to add any soil amendments now that I've planted?

The beds are up high and the beds slope and away to the yard that slopes down to the street. I think it drains pretty well, what's the best way to check?

I've planted copper canyon daisy's nearest, the shrubs are evergreen holly's (I think), also a 4-5 feet away are pincushions & Texas Betony.


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Mon Apr 18, 2011 8:14 pm 
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Location: Arlington, Texas
Well, I don't see anything in what you've done that is causing problems. What do they look like now, at the end of the day? I still wonder if it's just too hot for them since you just planted them.

You can take this suggestion, or leave it, since it's just what I would try: I would probably give it until at least Thursday until I started really thinking something is wrong. I would lay off the water, except putting just a cup or two right at the root ball, by hand, on Wednesday.

I have read that roses don't like to have their leaves wet, but my only experience with roses so far (other than LOTS of reading) is a knockout rose that I planted about a month ago. It is still growing, has several buds, and looks healthy and happy. No leaves chewed on, no thrips damage to any blossoms.
I only water it by hand, and haven't watered it from above. Although I plan to foliar feed it about once a month, with Garrett Juice, early in the morning.

Another thing I would be inclined to try (but, again, take this or leave it) would be to water with seaweed. It helps to establish strong roots, among other benefits.

One other thing: you don't mention is how thickly you mulched the site. My understanding is that roses like LOTS of organic matter. I have already added more partially completed compost on the soil surface around my rose.

Another thing I might try is to get some organic compost, scrape away the wood mulch, add and inch or so of compost all around the bush, then cover with the wood mulch.

Hope you're able to save your roses!!

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Cara
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Take time to stop and smell the flowers!
(or... as my ladybug refrigerator magnet says
"take time to stop and eat the flowers!" :D)


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 6:38 am 
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The roses should be able to handle the full sun. Are they still drooping in the morning? Knockout roses are even used in city landscaping where they hardly get any water or protection.

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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Tue Apr 19, 2011 9:55 am 
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Thanks again for the advice, as of this morning they are really droopy and some of the leaves are getting dry at the tips. I really amped up the organic matter on this bed, there is about 3/4 of an entire bag in the mound and that includes the amount I sprinkled prior to mulching. I mulched with just enough to get the mound covered but not more than 1-2" of mulch. Maybe I did over water? How should the mound feel from a consistency standpoint? Spongey? Or crumbly-wet? I'll check that next.


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 6:40 am 
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They do not need to stay soaking wet. I think it's overwatered. Feel the ground before watering and don't water if it's still moist. If the soil sticks to your fingers or you can squeeze a handful of it and it holds together then wait another day or 2. You don't need to add anything else to it.

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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 11:56 am 
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Looks a bit worse this morning, we checked the dirt and its moist but not overly wet. I'm beginning to wonder if we got a bad specimen. Everything else in the garden looks great.


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Wed Apr 20, 2011 9:21 pm 
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Location: Arlington, Texas
How many rose bushes did you plant? And do they all (both?) look bad?

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God speed!
Cara
**
Take time to stop and smell the flowers!
(or... as my ladybug refrigerator magnet says
"take time to stop and eat the flowers!" :D)


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Thu Apr 21, 2011 7:39 pm 
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I've tried posting a picture without much luck. There were 2 stems. I'm really questioning how I did the bare root method. I didn't research the "how to" before I committed to that planting method. The rest of the flowers (that were planted traditionally) were not planted bare roots...

The update on the little plant is that some of the leaves are drying about half and the rose blooms that were showing before I planted are quite dead. I think I'll need to replace this plant outright and maybe salvage this in a pot and replant elsewhere.


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Fri Apr 22, 2011 11:33 am 
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I guess I didn't realize they were bare root roses. That can be tricky. If they dry out or are damaged in the slightest, your results may not be so great...as you are seeing first hand. I would go for a non bare rooted rose.

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Sandi
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Texas Master Naturalist
Organic gardener
Tree-Hugger
Native Texan


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 Post subject: Re: Wilting Roses
PostPosted: Sun Apr 24, 2011 3:46 pm 
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It's kinda late in the year to be planting roses. Yes, it can be done year round, but if you're planting them in the spring, especially bare rooted ones, get them in the ground by March if at all possible.

For your situation, just continue to pamper them and hope for the best. In gardening there's generally few quick fixes if you got a sickish plant.


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